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The flashpoints for COVID-19 discussion have circulated a lot over the last few months. At the onset of the pandemic, people were focused on massive spreading events such as concerts and professional sporting events. Afterward, the conversation primarily shifted to businesses like restaurants, gyms, and bars, where social distancing and wearing masks are difficult or impossible to do completely in many circumstances.

Now, as we move into the fall, some of the bigger sources of controversy are college campuses. Some of the major spreading events are originating on college campuses and stories of wild parties where rules are non-existent are an area of concern. There’s an element of truth when it comes to college parties spreading the virus, but this doesn’t tell the whole story. …


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Businesses initiated their reopening plans as soon as restrictions started to be lifted. However, for customer-facing businesses, this a tough balancing act to strike. They want to have as many customers as possible to get profits back up, but also need to be effectively able to provide that they are safe enough to profit. It’s important to remember that not only are large swaths of the customer base afraid of getting sick, but they may be hurting financially due to the pandemic as well. This leads to people being more judicious with the businesses they patronize. …


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While there are a wide variety of different strategies in mind on how to best combat and curb COVID-19, one major common thread with all of these is increasing testing. However, there are bottlenecks with some of the expanded testing options, like testing resources as well as the availability of medical professionals to process said tests. One option that is gaining steam is the idea of an at-home self-service diagnostic for COVID-19. But what are some of the pros and cons of this concept?

At-Home Testing

First, let’s do a walkthrough of what some experts consider the ideal process for this type of testing. …


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There’s a lot of discussion going on regarding COVID-19 testing in the U.S. and worldwide. While there are quite a few schools of thought on the best path to take going forward, one common point of agreement is that the testing we have right now is not nearly enough to successfully contain the virus. Because of how COVID-19 spreads, the current delays between people taking their tests and getting results gives them plenty of time to spread the virus before realizing they are infected.

Rapid testing would be the ideal way to manage this, but what is the best option available when looking at this? …


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The COVID-19 pandemic has affected every aspect of our lives. And while it is, by nature, a health issue, it’s also becoming a social issue as well. A lot of this has to do with how information is spread about the virus. Granted, a novel coronavirus means that we have to do a lot of our learning as time goes on, but misinformation has become a pandemic of its own. In some cases, this is early misunderstandings becoming popular knowledge. In others, fires are being fanned for financial and political gain. …


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At this point, we are quickly heading toward the six-month mark of the COVID-19 pandemic. While the amount of loss seems difficult to fathom, we are seeing some general signs of improvement, like the amounts of infections and deaths starting to decrease overall.

However, there are still things to note on the horizon. For example, areas like university campuses are proving to be new hotspots as their school years start. In addition, there are growing concerns about the winter flu season coinciding with COVID-19. …


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Restaurants have been one of the epicenters of debate over what is safe and unsafe during the era of COVID-19. After a lockdown that was crippling financially to restaurant owners around the globe, restrictions allowed for reduced-capacity outdoor dining and takeout.

Some restaurants were well-equipped to handle the transition to this as their primary mode of business, while others were yearning for a chance to open up indoor dining. Now, as we head out of summer weather, restrictions are starting to loosen up further, and we are seeing indoor dining spread across the nation once again. However, this opens up a lot of safety concerns. …


“Dear Miss Manners: I have been invited to a BBQ. Should I ask the host to do a Virtual Handshake?”

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Recently, an acquaintance of mine reached out to me with an invitation to a small get-together. In the past, this wouldn’t be much of a story at all. However, we live in the age of COVID-19, and any sort of in-person contact needs to now be mulled over. Is it worth it? What risk am I taking by meeting with this person? Who could they potentially be in contact with? After thinking about it, I sent the following response:

“Hi — we are only attending events where everyone has taken the daily self-assessment test and confirm that they have not been exposed to anyone with the virus. And where everyone present can verify using the…


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Disclaimer: This blog was penned by an anonymous medical school student and edited/added onto by the COVID PreCheck content team.

As a 27-year-old adult, I spent the past summer months living at home with my parents. My lease was up at my house in Chapel Hill, and my new lease to move in with four of my friends wouldn’t begin until August. Never in a million years did I think I would be quarantining for months in my hometown due to a pandemic.

Universities across the nation were shut down and I had never had so much free time. I went from having 17-hour workdays to zero responsibilities or obligations. I found new ways to socialize through Zoom parties and filled my time completing 1,000-piece puzzles and painting canvases. …


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Right now, it’s commonplace for you to enter a place of business and have someone at the door check your temperature using a non-touch thermometer. This can apply whether you’re going to get a haircut, go out to eat where indoor dining is allowed, or even entering a medical facility like a doctor’s office or hospital. To be fair, when it comes to keeping people protected and at ease, some sort of check is better than nothing.

With fever being one of the early noticeable symptoms of COVID-19, it seems like a temperature check would be a good starting point. But we’re roughly 6 months into this pandemic taking root in the U.S. …

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COVID PreCheck

The most trusted digital health passport for COVID-19 tests.

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