Updated: 7/29/2020

Who wants to run an OKD 4 SNC on their Windows 10 workstation? Me for one.

This is guide is geared towards people who want to try ODK 4 on an existing workstation (minimum 24GB of RAM) without purchasing additional hardware like a NUC or home lab server.

OpenShift (OCP) has CodeReady Containers where you can set up an OpenShift cluster on your local machine for development and testing purposes. …


Updated: 7/29/2020

After listening to some feedback in the chat on a recent Twitch stream and the okd-wg mailing list I decided to create a guide for installing an OKD 4.5 SNC (single node cluster). This guide will use no worker nodes and only a single control-plane node with the goal of reducing the total amount of resources needed to get OKD up and running for a test drive.

VM Overview:

For this installation, I used an ESXi 6.5 host on my local network and allocated the total virtual machine RAM usage to 22GB. ESXi 6.5 has a minimum of 4GB of RAM but you should be able to run this on an ESXi host with 24GB of RAM. …


Updated 7/29/2020

OKD is the upstream and community-supported version of the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP). OpenShift expands vanilla Kubernetes into an application platform designed for enterprise use at scale. Starting with the release of OpenShift 4, the default operating system is Red Hat CoreOS, which provides an immutable infrastructure and automated updates. Fedora CoreOS, like OKD, is the upstream version of Red Hat CoreOS.

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You can experience OpenShift in your home lab by using the open-source upstream combination of OKD and FCOS (Fedora CoreOS) to build your cluster. …


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Updated: 5/26/2020

OKD is the upstream and community-supported version of the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP). OpenShift expands vanilla Kubernetes into an application platform designed for enterprise use at scale. Starting with the release of OpenShift 4, the default operating system is Red Hat CoreOS, which provides an immutable infrastructure and automated updates. Fedora CoreOS, like OKD, is the upstream version of Red Hat CoreOS.

For those of you who have a Home Lab, you can gain some experience with OpenShift by using the open-source upstream combination of OKD and FCOS (Fedora CoreOS) to build your own cluster.

Experience is an excellent way to learn new technologies. Used hardware for a home lab that could run an OKD cluster is relatively inexpensive these days ($250–$350), especially when compared to a cloud-hosted solution costing over $250 per month. …


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OKD 4.3 is NOT recommended.

Please use the OKD 4.4 version of this guide located here:

Let’s face it, the cloud is too expensive for OpenShift enthusiasts to set up a test OpenShift environment. Used hardware for a home lab that could run an OCP cluster among other things is relatively inexpensive these days, $250–$350, especially when compared to a cloud-hosted solution costing over $250 per month. The way many of us learn is through experience and with using home labs we can learn new technologies by installing, breaking, and fixing them ourselves.

Before deploying several OpenShift 3.11 clusters in a production environment, I perfected my playbooks and deployments in a home lab using the upstream version, OKD (previously known as origin). The amount of knowledge I gained by building, tearing down, and rebuilding the cluster several times has been valuable and has since been used that experience to solve production issues. When I found out in October of 2018 that OpenShift 4 was built following an immutable infrastructure principal and that when combined with CoreOS OpenShift offered OTA like updates, I was all in. …

About

Craig Robinson

OpenShift Enthusiast

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