Liz Jackson is the founder and chief advocacy officer of The Disabled List, a disability self-advocacy organization creating pathways for disabled people in design. Ahead of the inaugural World Interaction Design Day (IxDD) on September 25 — which this year highlights the theme of advancing diversity and inclusion in design — Adobe’s head of inclusive design, Matt May, sat down with Liz to learn about her new fellowship, WITH, and discuss how interaction designers can evolve their approach to inclusivity.

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Illustration: Justin Cheong.

Thanks for sitting down with us today, Liz. To kick things off, can you tell us a little bit about your background and how you got to where you are today?


This year, September 25 marks the inaugural World Interaction Design Day (IxDD), an annual celebration of interaction design and how it improves the human condition, created in partnership with the Interaction Design Association (IxDA). This year’s theme is “advancing diversity and inclusion in design,” and on September 25, the global design community will come together at events all over the world to discuss and learn how we can use design to create a more equitable future for everyone.

To celebrate the annual event, we want to reflect on the design pioneers who came before us — people who made significant, but often under-recognized, contributions to diversity and inclusion in design. …


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In our new series, UX Evolutions, we will be exploring how the user experience (UX) and user interfaces of some of the most prominent online services have changed over the years.

This time, we’re looking at how the wildly popular file-hosting service Dropbox has evolved. The concept came about when MIT student Drew Houston regularly forgot to bring his USB flash drive with him. Instead, he started creating a solution where he could have remote access to them. …


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Designers are at a tipping point in their relationship with the digital realm. The lack of thoughtful criticism of the work designers do is limiting the profession on many levels. We caught up with Khoi Vinh, principal designer at Adobe, at Interaction18 to capture his thoughts about the state of design discourse.

Type “tech backlash” into Google and you’ll see no shortage of recent headlines that express mistrust in big online products.

  • Users are wary about the unprecedented level of access Google has to our private and personal information.
  • Investors wrote a letter urging Apple to think beyond highly addictive devices. …


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When it comes to creating apps iteratively, nothing beats being able to design new features, tweak existing ones, and be able to test them out right away, not to mention share those designs with stakeholders easily. That sums up the core tenets of Adobe XD, an all-in-one UX/UI tool.

For Adobe XD’s design team, switching between multiple tools to create the app was getting frustrating. The team decided to take the plunge, and they began using Adobe XD to design Adobe XD.

Early Days, Early Innovations and Challenges

As he was designing Adobe XD, Lead Product Designer Talin Wadsworth turned to his own app and quickly realized, even in its rudimentary phases, Adobe XD allowed him to quickly iterate and share design ideas with his team. …


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Whether you’ve found the love of your life already or you’re searching this Valentine’s Day, there’s a good chance you have enlisted the help of a dating app. With its iconic swipe right/swipe left mechanics and pared-down approach to matchmaking, Tinder has risen to become one of the most successful dating apps, ever. So what makes the app so successful over much of the competition? The UX, of course.

We asked two of Tinder’s product designers to talk us through the app’s user-centered approach to design, and to share what they’ve learned designing a companion app for a very emotional human experience. …


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Image credited to Boosted.

Many people dream about making a living doing something that combines their passions. Kyson Dana and Hayden Shaum are living that dream. Kyson is the art director and Hayden is a designer at Boosted, a company positioning itself as the future of transportation. With its powerful electric skateboard, Boosted has amassed a loyal following in cities around the world. Those followers are commuters looking for an easier way to get to work, and board sports enthusiasts looking for new experiences.

Recognizing the enthusiasm of the Boosted community, the company decided to enhance the Community section of its website to better serve the needs of riders. …


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Image credited to Adobe Stock.

User experience is a broad discipline. Anyone who practices UX design should have skills in many different fields. While it’s impossible to summarize all the information that’s helpful in a single article, it is still possible to highlight the most important rules every UX designer should follow to create an excellent experiences for people.

Here are the 15 essential rules that every designer should be familiar with.

1. UX is not (only) UI

User Interface is a part of User Experience

Swapping UX with UI, as if the two are the same, is a common mistake among many designers. It’s essential to understand the difference between the two disciplines, and we’ve covered the topic of UX design in detail in the article What You Should Know About User Experience. In short, User Interface the space where interactions between humans and a product occur, while User Experience is an emotional outcome after interactions with a product. …


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We’re living in a time when design and user experience have never mattered more. The past decade of change shows us that design must constantly adapt as a discipline in order to meet user needs.While it’s impossible to see the future, we can still make some educated guesses about it. In this article, I go through some of the trends that will shape UX design in 2018 and, possibly, for several more years to come.

1. Content-Focused Experiences

Recent trends like minimalism and flat design focus on one thing. They remove the distraction from what’s really important: content. Content-focused experiences are experiences in which content shapes design (or design emphasizes content). A designer’s mission is to make sure that nothing impedes a viewer’s experience of the content. …


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Testing is a fundamental part of the UX designer’s job and a core part of the overall UX design process. Testing provides the inspiration, guidance and validation that product teams need in order to design great products. That’s why the most effective teams make testing a habit.

Usability testing involves observing users as they use a product. It helps you find where users struggle and what they like. There are two ways to run a usability test:

  • Moderated, in which a moderator works with a test participant
  • Unmoderated, in which the test participant completes the test alone

We’ll focus on the first, but some of the tips mentioned can be applied to both types of testing. …

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