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Photo by Ryan Quintal on Unsplash

Cross posted from here (Spanish version).

The initiative for a Common Microcredential Framework driven by the European MOOC Consortium, which brings together Europe’s largest MOOC providers — its members are FutureLearn, based in the UK and 10 million students; MiriadaX, based in Spain and 4 million students; FUN, with headquarters in France and 1.6 million students; and EduOpen, with headquarters in Italy and 54,000 students — , has once again highlighted the opportunity to review the certification mechanism that European universities have been applying since the implementation of the Bologna Plan.

The European Higher Education Area (EHEA) was created with the aim — among many others — of having a homogeneous scheme to provide students with the skills they need, and also to certify evidence of the achievement of those skills. It was also intended that this scheme could be projected beyond the academy in a way that would be useful for accrediting lifelong learning. Universities took this model as a reference and focused their curricula on the development of competencies by students. In general, the aim was to advance in the certification of skills acquired in academia, while at the same time establishing links with the workplace and eventually with open and non-formal learning practices. …


Access to learning that takes place outside a classroom is a complex task since informal channels that people use to acquire knowledge are not easily detected. A conventional way of doing this is to identify different scenarios where learning practices take place — mainly non-formal and informal learning spaces, such as associations, non-profit organizations, museums, etc. — and then analyze the communities of practice formed by people interested in acquiring knowledge. But beyond this linear approaches to educational research, some digital tools such as learning playlists are opening up more promising paths. The following is a proposal to use learning playlists to “embed” informally acquired knowledge, within the framework of a project that aims to identify the scientific skills acquired by citizens outside the classroom. …


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Map GISforThought.com

Cross posted from here (in Spanish). This is the third post in a series examining the impact of digital connectivity in universities. See here for previous posts.

Daniel Dominguez & Jose Francisco Alvarez

It is commonplace to defend the mobility of students as a source of quality in higher education. Usually it is taken for granted that internationalization leads to an improvement of university activity. Assuming that principle today requires some preliminary analysis. As with many other issues it is appropriate to go deeper and analyze the nuances to achieve the most interesting opinions.

The tradition indicates that international mobility has been important since the origins of the university, either in the European Middle Ages or earlier. In that sense, it is worth recalling that “when the first European university was founded in Bologna in 1088, the Indian University of Nalanda had more than six hundred years providing higher education to thousands of students from Asian countries” (A. Sen, India: The Stormy Revival of an International University. The New York Review of Books, August 13, 2015). …


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Monopoly game

This is the second post in a series examining the impact of digital connectivity in universities. See here for the first post. Also cross posted from and a Spanish versionhere.

Daniel Dominguez & Jose Francisco Alvarez

There are many challenges that digital connectivity set out to universities. In this article we highlight the evolution towards a strategy of institutional openness that allows to design learning spaces that connect both the interest of students and the stakeholders in the innovation and knowledge. Currently this institutional opening is confronted with traditional approaches that consider the university as the central physical reference of the production and dissemination of knowledge, innovation and even entrepreneurship. …


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Photo by Alex Jones

Post published by Daniel Domínguez and José F. Alvarez at UniverSIdad on 8th February 2016, in the context of a broader discussion on the future of higher education. A Spanish version of the text is available here.

In 2014, we coordinated an special issue of Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos (769–770, 2014) about the Ibero-american University in the twenty-first century. In that volume, we have the participation of leading experts who contributed with their views on the current state and evolution of the university from very different optical. …

About

Daniel Dominguez

Professor at @uned. Internet research, connected & open learning, cybersociety. Founding member @CoLabUNED. Board of Directors @CyberPractices.

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