By Tori Agawa and Daniel Kunkel

As a kid, I (Tori) hated waiting for my parents’ help with school projects. I was the youngest of five, and when asked for help my parents would give a backhanded wave and utter, “Five minutes, honey.” For those of you from big families, you know that five minutes really means thirty on a good day. And at the tender age of eight, thirty minutes may as well have been three years.

Eight-year-old Tori hated not knowing how to do something. But what she hated even more was having to wait for someone who did know how to do it…


Many white people are filled with rage as they have watched the video of the lynching of Ahmaud Arbery. While our aggression has helped put the two men responsible in jail, racism cannot be shackled and locked away. It’s lingering in our neighborhoods, classrooms, churches, and homes. Racism has never been eradicated but has only adapted to our society. If we continue to only be aggravated about racial injustice when there is a video, we may be tempted to believe that racism takes place in isolated instances. Which will cause us to miss the larger picture of systemic and institutionalized…


As an eleven year old, I loved precisely four things: Dr. Pepper, Jalapeño and Cheese corn dogs, my Mom, and the Church of Christ. The Church of Christ is a denomination that is many things, most notably known for their belief in worship without musical instruments. The Church of Christ that I attended was mostly occupied by couples in their sixties, seventies, eighties, and yes, even nineties. The church was literally attached to a retirement home. …


During grade school I always anticipated going shopping for school clothes. It was like a shopping spree but practical and for good use. With new clothes I would be able to mask the torment I was experiencing— puberty. There was just one problem, my clothes size was labeled “husky”. It was Levi’s and Old Navy’s way of calling me chubby, and I hated it. The term demeaned my whole body and its experiences down to a single word. …


By Naseem Khalili and Daniel Kunkel

Every morning I (Daniel) wake up and read the New York Times. I skim across headlines that tell stories of rising unemployment rates, more death, cities on their last leg, and healthcare workers continuing to risk their lives. The news informs me of a world just moments away from destruction and yet, I am doing well. As I read these headlines, I feel like the world’s worst double agent; I am doing great in the middle of the pandemic but no one must find out. I feel guilty, I am able to work from…


By Daniel Kunkel and Fred Mok

Purpose of This Series

We received a number of positive comments about the first part of this series. And then there were comments like “withholding judgment until Part 2” or “waiting for the meat”. I (Fred) get the sense that Daniel and I are the meat and predators are waiting to pounce on us. Once we start making recommendations about who and what to vote for, we become the prey. That seems to be true for anyone attempting to engage in politics and we both recognize the risk that entails.

However, the purpose of this series is NOT…


Much of the Christian journey is learning to unlearn. This is true for almost any age or culture. As a college minister I don’t actually spend a lot of time teaching people about Jesus, I end up teaching them who he is not. This is because many people have conjured up an image of Jesus that is based on their background, movies, and that guy who screams into a megaphone about how we are going to hell. Many college students think they don’t need to learn about Jesus and they are right, they need to unlearn who they think he…


By Fred Mok and Daniel Kunkel

When you identify as an evangelical, you’re obligated to buy a package of political beliefs that you may not want.

I (Fred) was talking about faith and politics with a Christian who was raised and educated outside of the United States. My friend commented that being an evangelical in the United States is like buying a bundle of cable channels, many of which he would not watch. I got cable in the summer of 2016 to watch the Olympics. I couldn’t get my TV antenna operating to receive the network channels so I bought the basic package from our cable…


At a very young age I took a liking to politics. The fusion of power and policy has always made me eager to learn about the art form. It has led me to memorize the most strange facts about presidents and obsessively hover over historical and legislative books. My love affair with politics is a rarity. For many, politics is the problem and somehow the solution. For others, it’s boring and confusing, and they fail to see how it affects their daily lives. Yet, many Christians either refrain from engaging politically or they engage apart from their identity as a…


Bonhoeffer, Easter 1932. Courtney of Deutsche Fotothek

A Short Reflection on Dietrich Bonhoeffer

On April 8th,1945 Dietrich Bonhoeffer gave what would be his final sermon at an abandoned schoolhouse in Schönberg. It was Easter, and the Protestant Bonhoeffer was elected by his group of mostly Catholic prisoners to give a sermon. Bonhoeffer preferred not to, but reluctantly agreed after an atheist gentlemen joined in and insisted that he preach. Bonhoeffer then spoke on two passages, Isaiah 53:5 and 1 Peter 1:3. As he was finishing the closing prayer, two prison guards broke open the doors of the schoolhouse and said, “Prisoner Bonhoeffer. Get ready come with us.” Those in the room knew this…

Daniel J. Kunkel

Missionary with Cru in the Bay Area. Host of the Everything in Between podcast. danieljkunkel.com

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store