Ride2school activity

INTRODUCTION

We all remember learning to ride our bike, We also all remember falling over every few minutes in the process. Well our brief involves teaching kids in primary school about the safety of riding their bikes. Our goal is to create a new E-Learning activity for students, teaching them about their bike and how to be safe when riding them. Ride2Work run a program for primary school students called Ride2School, in an attempt to get kids excited about riding their bike to school by collecting points for their school. This is a nationally run event, striving to get more people active, and help decrease our emissions.

THE TEAM

We are Daniella Curcio and Lachlan Borg, a pair of second year students studying an advanced diploma in graphic design at Tractor design school. We each have our own strengths and weakness, Daniella is great at concept development, illustration, and planning, how ever can find time management and coding a difficult task. Lachlan is strongest during the digital stage of development, creating vectors, UI layouts, and managing time, but selecting colour pallets and illustrating are an issue.

OUR FOCUS

We began our project with the most vital stage, planing, by using the SMART development strategy to develop a set of goals we wish to focus our activity on. We also took to developing a task management system using Trello, this was to ensure we stay on target and achieve our goal.

The two goals we decide to pursue were as follows:

  • Students will learn 5 parts of a bike and how they work
  • Students will learn the key safety rules for ridding a bike

PERSONA’S

With every brief we need a target audience, we gathered up some research on audiences involved and created persona’s based on 2 users that would find this activity educational and helpful.

For these persona’s we focused one on the teacher, and one on the student, this is to ensure that both users of this activity are taken into consideration. The teacher needs to be able to operate and deliver any content required for the activity, and also be able to provide help if required. Making sure that the UI is easy to understand and operate is important, if a user has a bad experience with the layout or functionality of a design, then they may become lost and annoyed with the software.

Our first persona was Miss Williams, she is a 42 year old primary school teacher who wants to teach her students about bike safety, and make them more familiar with how they work. She likes her students to enjoy what they are learning, no boring work sheets for activities.

Our second persona was Cindy Owen, an 11 year old 5th grader who is easily distracted and enjoys visual learning. She is a bit nervous when it comes to ridding a bike, she hopes that if she knows more about it she will feel safer.

RESEARCH

Over the next few days we spent our time researching into the different ways people take to learning, from being visual to being Kinesthetic. We then delve deeper into the different ways to communicate with each learning style , formulating different strategies and activities that will communicate to all three, and devised which best suits our persona and target audience.

After conducting further research we discovered that a younger audience responds well to learning activities that involve games and clear instruction, with goals and rewards. Interaction is also a key stimulus to ensure that a younger learner stays focused and takes on bored the information given. A visual learner is exactly as it sounds, they take on information by video, imagery, or even simply reading.

Form this research we were able to create a 2 part learning activity that involves an interactive infographic, and a quiz to test the knowledge gained from the infographic. Both these activities are completed on an iPad, this is because it is the latest in learning tools used in primary schools, and is great for interactive learning, there is a lot more that can be done than with a mouse and keyboard.

How it will work

Students will first be advised to launch the ride2school application on their iPads, this will bring them to the opening screen that features a short into animation. The kids will be instructed to click the bike button, this will bring up the interactive infographic. A small pop up will appear with instructions on how it works, telling them to simply tap certain parts of the bike to get information on what they are and how they work.

After about 10 minutes, once they have taken on some information form that they will be instructed to tap the next button, bringing them to the second screen of the infographic. This will be a short animation of a bike riding and information pops up along the way, covering safety of riding a bike.

Once the students have reached the end of the short animation the “Take the quiz” button will appear, launching the second half of the exercise. This quiz is disguised to look like a game, although it is simply multiple choice it also features a bike in the lower part of the screen which moves forward as they get answers correct. The quiz features 7 questions about the topics covered in the infographic half of the activity. These questions will be recycled later on in the quiz if they get any wrong, this is to ensure they take on the information required to answer the question. Each time they get a question correct, they will see a pop up saying so and informing them about why it is correct, then the bike will move a step closer to the goal. When they are incorrect they will get a pop up that tells them the correct information and the bike will stay in its current position.

If everything runs smoothly and the students get to the end goal they will be presented with a fake certificate stating that they are ready to get on the road and ride a bike, it will also feature a link to register and take part ride2school event.

Prototyping stage

After gathering all the information we found through out the research, it was time to put this thing together. Planning out what assets will be required and what prototyping software we will use was the last phase before the execution. We decided that Marvel would best suit our needs as it is simple drag and drop click boxes to create interactivity, it also is functional on hand held devices such as tablets.

To create the assets needed, Illustrator was the best option to create simple vectors for the prototype, starting with the interactive bike. We created two different bikes, one that was very minimal for the quiz section, and one that had extra details such as breaks and chains. This was so that for the interactive element the students could get a better understanding of what’s what, and how it works. It was quite simple to integrate this with Marvel, we uploaded the constructed files and placed them, animated them, and made them touch responsive.

We were faced with a small bump in the road when creating the prototype, we needed to make it so the wrong answers get cycled through randomly as the quiz continues. It proved to be a difficult task when using marvel, as it is simply a prototyping software, so to fix this we had to simplify it and make to the quiz simply redirects you to the same question again. Although this is not what we want for the final product, it was the best option to still et the same experience of getting something wrong.

The next step in completing this brief will be collecting results from the rapid prototype testing taking place next week. Hopefully receiving a successful response we will be able to finalize the prototype with any adjustments, and even improve its visual appeal for final development.

POST USER TESTING

After the session, review what you have learnt by answering the following questions.

learning objectives

  • Kids will learn key bike safety rules.
  • Kids will learn at least 5 bike parts and how they work.

a. How was this learning objective being measured or assessed?

The learning objectives were measured and assessed by presenting a fun build your bike kind of interactivity followed by an animation that teaches kids small tips on bike safety. After these 2 activities the kids will then take a quiz which will asses them on how well they took on the information.

b. Did the user achieve this learning objective? (yes / no / partly)

Yes, the user met the learning objective because they got through the whole quiz with no problems.

c. Could the objective be achieved more effectively or efficiently?

Yes, we could have had better knowledge of coding to make the interactive prototype work better. We also could have included more detail to our illustrations.

2. How did the session go?

All of our sessions went well. All users found it easy to use and got throught the quiz with no problems.

a. Did the facilitator have to step in at any stage due to the user being lost or confused?

We didnt have any big enough problems for us to step in and explain further what was needed to do. Everything ran very smoothly and every user got through the quiz.

b. How long did the session take?

The sessions took around 3 minutes for each session.

c. Was this longer or shorter than you expected?

Definitely short than we expected. I feel like we might have not put enough information into the activity. This is something we could have improved.

d. Did the user make it to the end of the session?

Yes, all of our user reached the end of the activites. They all found it easy to use and got through it very quickly.

3. Was the resource appropriate for the type of learner?

Yes it was. We used visuals and minimal content as some kids learn better through visuals. The resources linked in with all of the activities and learning types.

a. Did the user get board or distracted at any stage?

Not that they mentioned. A few of them mentioned it was at a good speed and they had fun while completing the activites.

b. Discuss how you could user other learning techniques to better engage the user.

From doing tests on other students eLearning Activities, I think we could have maybe created a hands on activity for the users to be apart of. Such as a word search or dot to dot, Just some examples. Just to make it more fun for the kids.

THE SESSION AND RESULTS

To begin the prototype testing we sat the user’s down and ran the activity as it would have in a class environment. We each took turns of being the “teacher” and being the observer who took notes on the feedback.

As the teacher, we began by informing the user what it is they will be doing for the activity, and even giving them a few instructions on how to operate the prototype. This helped to ensure a clear understanding of what to do and gain better perspective on how the finished product may work.

All the users tested seemed to have a positive response to running the test like this, they instantly understood what to do and had no further questions. By giving them a bit of a back story to how the program would run, the user was able to get in the right mind set and have a better perspective of what it may be like for a student.

After completing the user test we were able to ask them for any feed back and ways to improve the activity and how it was run. We then reviewed this feed back and found that some minor improvement should be made. A common suggestion was to make the interactive inforgraphic feature some sort of check list or indication that you have looked at all parts of the bike, even show something so that users know which parts are interactive. Another great suggestion was to make the animation longer so that more info and animation can be displayed, this would also be great to increase the time it takes to complete the activity. The last helpful response was that for the quiz some colour alterations may need to be made to help indicate that the user got the answer correct or wrong, so simply make it green or red.

As for changes to how the activity is run, we didn’t receive much feedback o, but form our own observation we thought it may be good to have the instructions on screen and maybe even examples, this way the teacher wouldn’t have to do much explaining and it will be clearer for any student who may not have been listening.

When we planned this project out we set our selves the goal of spending all up 19 hours dedicated to reach the final stage. By referring back to our time line we able to ensure that we stayed on track and met all time requirements we had put in place, this gave us an end result of the whole project costing $570, since we charged the client $30 an hour. It’s always a smart idea to set your self these budgets and time frames that way you will have a more accurate quote to give to your client, and ensure that you will meet your deadline.

For a further look into how our prototype run, I have taken a few screen captures of it in action, and beneath each image is an explanation of what is happening.

This is the first part of the activity, the interactive infographic, this is the point after being instructed to launch the application the students would be given the instruction to spend 5 minutes tapping on parts of the bike to learn about what they are and how they work.

So once they tap a part of the bike the information pops up next to it, and by simply tapping anywhere on the screen the information goes away. By having this small interaction, students will be more interested and intrigued by the information presented. When the students have spent enough time learning their bike, they can tap the next button to view the short informational animation.

This short video will play when the student taps the play button, featuring a bike riding along with a few safety rules popping up along the way. The idea is that by having a video and a fun little tune the students will stay focused and engaged in the information being displayed, rather than just having boring text on a screen. When the video finishes the students can then be instructed to wait until everyone is finished and begin the quiz in the last part of the activity.

Questions

After the session, review what you have learnt by answering the following questions.

1. List your learning objectives?

  • Kids will learn key bike safety rules.
  • Kids will learn at least 5 bike parts and how they work.

a. How was this learning objective being measured or assessed?

The learning objectives were measured and assessed by presenting a fun build your bike kind of interactivity followed by an animation that teaches kids small tips on bike safety. After these 2 activities the kids will then take a quiz which will asses them on how well they took on the information.

b. Did the user achieve this learning objective? (yes / no / partly)

Yes, the user met the learning objective because they got through the whole quiz with no problems.

c. Could the objective be achieved more effectively or efficiently?

Yes, we could have had better knowledge of coding to make the interactive prototype work better. We also could have included more detail to our illustrations.

2. How did the session go?

All of our sessions went well. All users found it easy to use and got throught the quiz with no problems.

a. Did the facilitator have to step in at any stage due to the user being lost or confused?

We didnt have any big enough problems for us to step in and explain further what was needed to do. Everything ran very smoothly and every user got through the quiz.

b. How long did the session take?

The sessions took around 3 minutes for each session.

c. Was this longer or shorter than you expected?

Definitely short than we expected. I feel like we might have not put enough information into the activity. This is something we could have improved.

d. Did the user make it to the end of the session?

Yes, all of our user reached the end of the activites. They all found it easy to use and got through it very quickly.

3. Was the resource appropriate for the type of learner?

Yes it was. We used visuals and minimal content as some kids learn better through visuals. The resources linked in with all of the activities and learning types.

a. Did the user get board or distracted at any stage?

Not that they mentioned. A few of them mentioned it was at a good speed and they had fun while completing the activites.

b. Discuss how you could user other learning techniques to better engage the user.

From doing tests on other students eLearning Activities, I think we could have maybe created a hands on activity for the users to be apart of. Such as a word search or dot to dot, Just some examples. Just to make it more fun for the kids.

The quiz is simply just a multiple choice test, covering what information they should have learned from the first two parts of the activity. But below the questions is a little bike and the teacher will have informed the students that for each correct answer the bike moves closer to the goal, but if they get it wrong the bike stays where it is. This small feature makes a plain old quiz look like a game, making it a lot more intuitive for students since game based learning is so successful.

In conclusion, this user test ran smoothly and we were able to learn that our activity was quite effective and met all our goals. After completing this we have learned that there are some key strategies that should be taken on when attempting a project like this in the future. When in the planning stage devote a large amount of time into researching and brainstorming ideas, this will ensure that the project is effective and that you have covered everything required. When creating the prototype be sure to collaborate with someone who has knowledge of coding, this will help create a better interaction for the user and reduce limitations of the prototyping software. One last bit of advice would be to constantly communicate with your team and refer back to your persona’s, this will ensure that you don’t go off track and get an overall better result.

This has been Danielle and Lachlan, we hope that this post was helpful and informal, feel free to leave any comments in the open discussion below and we will be sure to get back to you.

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