Nailing your elevator pitch!

In my 20 years of sales experience I have been on countless courses & read many books & articles on the perfect pitch. In my opinion it can be easy to over think it and end up with an overly complicated pitch which still leaves people guessing as to what it is you actually have to offer.

The first thing to tackle is… if you are in business, but don’t realise you are in sales…

Everything you say, and the way you say it represents you and what you have to offer. If this isn’t as good as it can be, then you are losing leads, which means less clients which equals less money… I think you get the picture. So, my very first tip is get comfortable with ‘sales’!

Now onto content… Whilst it’s important to stick with the K.I.S.S (Keep It Simple Stupid) method & ensure that even your grandparents can understand from your pitch what it is you do, there’s often an element that people forget about… the importance of first impressions…

Current human attention span is down to just 8 seconds (yes, that’s less than a goldfish!), so a few questions to ask yourself…

- How are you going to grab someone’s attention (positively) within that 8 seconds?

- How can you be compelling & memorable? (you need them to remember you for the right reasons when you follow up with them!)

- How will you differentiate yourself from someone offering the same or a similar offering?

So the first thing to think about is your opening line… what is it you help your customers achieve or what issues do you solve?

Let me give you a very simple example…

When you’re asked the question… “so, what do you do?”

Which of these opening lines do you think would peak someone’s interest?

a. “I’m an accountant” (or even worse “I’m just an accountant”!)

b. “I help business owners pay less tax”

What do you think your chance of even getting as far as being able to pitch is if you open with a?

The person you’re talking to is likely to politely smile & say something like “ah that’s nice” or if you’re really lucky they might ask you if you enjoy it or how long you’ve been doing it for. But really they’ll just be waiting for you to ask what they do so that they can pitch their offering and/or move on to another topic of conversation altogether.

How do you think they’ll react if you open with b.?

Maybe “oh, how do you do that?!”

This leads us into the 2nd part of your pitch where you’ve nicely set yourself up to talk about how you help your clients (rather than feature, functions & costs!).

For this part of your pitch you also need a well-rehearsed clear & simple description of how you work with your clients to achieve results.

Maybe something like…

“It’s on a case by case basis, but the good news is there are a number of ways in which we achieve this… including:

*ensuring that they are using the most tax efficient savings & investments

*as well as knowing which assets are better being assigned to an individual or jointly.

Next is case studies…

I’d highly recommend knowing a few simple case studies off the top of your head (so that you can pick the most relevant one for the person you’re speaking to)…

A case study in a pitch should be simple, clear & articulate… e.g.

I worked with CLIENT, who was IN THIS SITUATION and I’ve helped them achieve X in X PERIOD OF TIME.

Spend lots of time on this. Practice. Tweak. Perfect.

Good luck with building your solid pitch!

Practice like you’ve never won. Perform like you’ve never lost.