Kubernetes and its massive ecosystem can easily overwhelm people but often, a simple Kubernetes cluster setup is already enough.

The Kubernetes and cloud-native ecosystem has become very complex over time. The best illustration for this is probably the CNCF Landscape that currently contains about 1,500 cards. This huge amount of different cloud-native projects and tools has led some people to complain about the overwhelming complexity of the ecosystem recently, while others took it with humor and started to create memes about it.

However, there is not only the CNCF Landscape that can lead to some confusion, there are also CNCF sandbox, incubating, and graduated projects as well as many additional startups and other vendors developing solutions without being part…


Several factors drive more and more companies to develop and adopt internal Kubernetes platforms for their engineers.

Recently, you might have heard about “internal Kubernetes platforms” from many different sources: KubeCon talks, blog articles, or just colleagues and friends. Even if such platforms are not always called internal Kubernetes platforms, solutions that allow engineers to get a standardized and easy Kubernetes access in a cloud environment seem to become more common now.

In this article, I will describe what drives companies to build and adopt such platforms. …


Virtual Kubernetes clusters cannot only be used for development settings but can also improve production systems in multiple ways.

The idea of virtual Kubernetes clusters (vClusters) is to spin up a fully-functional cluster within another Kubernetes clusters to provide an efficient abstraction and direct Kubernetes access on top of a shared underlying cluster.

I have already described the benefits and use cases use of such virtual clusters for development, and specifically for cloud-native development, CI/CD, and ML/AI experimentation. …


Reducing the number of clusters can save a lot of cost without affecting the stability of your system.

When you are using Kubernetes at a larger scale and at different stages (development, testing, production), you will sooner or later face the question of how many clusters you should run. Finding the right answer to this question is as not easy as having many clusters has advantages and disadvantages compared to running only one or a few clusters, as discussed in this article.

However, your answer to this question also determines how much you will have to pay for your Kubernetes system. In general, it is cheaper to run only a few clusters, which is why I will explain…


A Kubernetes sandbox is a great complement to cloud-native tools to complete an optimal developer experience.

Using sandbox environments is very common for software developers because it allows them to work, test, and experiment in an environment that is isolated from the production system but still provides a realistic experience. As a consequence of this early validation, the software quality improves and the number of bugs decreases. Because of this, “it-works-on-my-machine”-problems can be ruled out.

Now that the production environment is often Kubernetes, the engineers should therefore also start to work with Kubernetes. However, to establish efficient development workflows with…


Reducing the cost of running Kubernetes at a larger scale and with many users will become a priority for many companies soon.

Running Kubernetes can be very expensive, especially when it is done inefficiently. This is often the case when companies have just started to roll out Kubernetes in their organizations as then the same configuration and setup are often used that worked well for initial test projects or small applications. Such an initial unoptimized setup is probably normal. …


There are several ways of providing developers with a Kubernetes work environment and all have advantages and disadvantages.

Kubernetes has left the state when it was mostly an ops technology behind and now is also very relevant for many developers. As I wrote in my blog post about the Kubernetes workflow, the first step for every developer who starts to directly work with Kubernetes is to set up/get access to a Kubernetes development environment.

A Kubernetes work environment is not only the first step but also a basic requirement to be able to work with Kubernetes at all. Still, the…


A guide on how to tackle typical Kubernetes multi-tenancy challenges by implementing some best practices.

Kubernetes multi-tenancy is a topic that more and more organizations are interested in as their Kubernetes usage spreads out. However, since Kubernetes is not a multi-tenant system per se, getting multi-tenancy right comes with some challenges.

In this article, I will describe these challenges and how to overcome them as well as some useful tools for Kubernetes multi-tenancy. …


Self-service for namespaces will lead to a broader use of Kubernetes by engineers in any organization.

Many companies have adopted Kubernetes recently. However, most of them still do not realize its full potential because the actual Kubernetes usage in these organizations is very limited. Since Kubernetes has evolved dramatically, it is now not only a technology for operations anymore but also non-ops engineers can work with it. For this, Kubernetes adoption should not end here, it rather just starts.

So, it now often makes sense to also include engineers in the Kubernetes adoption process and, as the latest Stack Overflow…


Establishing an efficient Kubernetes development workflow is critical for the success and the acceptance of your Kubernetes adoption.

More developers than ever before are now working with Kubernetes. This means that also their workflows have to change to account for this technology that originally was not made for developers. However, integrating Kubernetes into efficient development workflows is not easy and comprises several aspects that I will discuss in this article.

Not all companies are using Kubernetes in the same way and to the same extent. …

Daniel Thiry

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