A Social E-learning experiment to support Biology Learning in Indonesian High School Education

Daniel Shen
Dec 9, 2019 · 6 min read

Schools with high teacher to student ratios often evaluates learning progress with assessments. These are summative assessments. However these make it hard to personalize learning for students. Self-paced e-learning could make it harder due to increased “distance” between teachers/students. There simply isnt relevant content delivered in an easy to process way for teachers.

On 5th December, Soqqle partnered with SMAN6 for Biology to try social e-learning. The goal is for students to capture their micro-learning outcome in the form of pictures. Learning information is shared with teachers Mrs Aryati and Mrs Rina for evaluation of learning outcomes.

Objective

Provide teachers enhanced learning analytics with a mobile-first tech-enabled tool. This encourages “student-generated content” in the school

Student Generated Content is content self-generated by students in a familiar method and medium

Problems we try to solve (with Literature)

Create new type of engagement into the classroom for mobile-based learning

In didactic models, educators struggle to maintain content relevance to individual student expectations. Students may drift off lessons due to a lack of clarity of purpose, with relations to daily life.

A core goal of ours is to link classroom activity with intrinsic and extrinsic motivations. These are social reputation, or problem-based learning. It could be way more interesting for the student.

M. Nuswowati, M. Taufiq (2015) articulates problem-based learning’s link with increased critical thinking. But Problem-based learning is time-consuming and is often a manual process to prepare. We attempt to try to automate the process through our social app.

Incorporate a new type of social app into lesson curriculum to facilitate data optimization

Adhi Susilo (2008) describes that network learning communities can construct and reflect information on a deeper level. This type of learning relies not on memory but deep routed knowledge. Thankfully technology has grown since, and mobile applications increased in memory and processing. Now the ability to maximize this benefit is now even greater.

Technology to capture images of lesson outcomes could help educators measure learning progress. When presented as learning analytics, teachers can scaffold students in an appropriate direction. Furthermore, as content are self-generated, content are a more accurate reflection of assessment.

Use social gamification to create student-generated content in the school

An experiment by Amriani, Ali, Utomo, Junus (2013) showed that removing gamification causes significant decrement on student participation. At that time, it was unclear on scalability of adding deep gamification. However, with the introduction of social apps like TikTok, there are new ways of adding social gamification. These could drive new positive goals.

Our experiment attempts to place students into a community-driven environment with self-driven content. Engaged with peers, a new type of social reputation is created. Moderated by teachers, this gives students opportunities to create content in a “sandbox”. Teachers can then engage deeper with students to develop more relatable learning outcomes.

Use technology to potentially encourage peer to peer learning for a visual topic like Biology — making it interesting for students

Komang Wastawan (2014) showed a significant increase in learning outcomes with cooperative learning and pictures . Pictures helped students grasp material better. It can help construct context between the media, text and learning objectives.

Digital media such as pictures and videos can be brought into curriculum for visual-rich content like Biology. Students could now find the link between teacher explanations and actual applications quicker. As peers share content, students can form more understanding with wider learning patterns.

The methodology and approach

The scope of the project will cover

  • 30 students in Biology
  • The app will be used by students to capture their discussion, presentation and output
  • A learning dashboard (web-based) will capture the learning outcomes

Discussion

Student notes are usually captured on paper. Data is therefore lost. We want to capture these via the app. Although it is known that these handwritten unstructured text will still be a problem to process even if captured digitally.

Visual

Teachers don’t often have context of the individual progress of each student. By allowing students to capture the visuals of their learning, the teacher can receive richer content about learning.

Memory Retention / Presentation

Students often forget about the activities that was done in school. By capturing key events like presentations, students can easily re-visit learning outcomes that was done in the past.

Expected Outcomes

Content

Student-generated content will be created and shared. These are deemed to be valuable due to the “raw” nature of the reflection of the student’s micro-learning progress.

Engagement

Due to increased volume of student-generated content, there will be evidence of higher engagement.

Teacher analytics

A dashboard will provide a view of captured content. Teacher will be able to streamline his review of the increased content. Note: However it is expected this to be an iterative adjustment after a proof of concept.

Success Measures

Increased student-generated learning content that otherwise would not have been created if exercise was done in traditional learning environment

Process

Students teamed up in groups of 5 to conduct a classroom activity on evolution theory. After watching a video on the topic, students were given 10 minutes to discuss and present if they agree or disagree.

Students were asked to capture presentations and comment.

At the end of the class, we asked each student to share their learning outcomes from the session.

Teacher’s Dashboard View

The teacher can add a comment which sends a comment to the student’s post. However this functionality is a work in progress, however a few students tried to use it to engage with each other.

Some students really went all out to write!
Some decided to write on the phones — this is better for machine learning
Sometimes it‘s short and sweet.

Conclusion

Social E-Learning is a new pedagogy for education. For Indonesia, the opportunity to create a community-based approach to create new engagement in classroom is a huge opportunity. Whilst teachers could perform all of these offline, capturing them online in a mode that is native to youths is instrumental for retention and engagement.

Using visuals to help students document their learning process and share it could then inspire youths to create. Our next foray into social e-learning in Bogor will be in laboratory sessions and English.

Stay tuned!

References

Adhi Susilo - USE OF FACEBOOK FOR ACADEMIC NETWORK LEARNING IN UNIVERSITAS TERBUKA — INDONESIA, 2008

M. Nuswowati1, M. Taufiq — DEVELOPING CREATIVE THINKING SKILLS AND CREATIVE ATTITUDE THROUGH PROBLEM BASED GREEN VISION CHEMISTRY ENVIRONMENT LEARNING, 2015

Amriani, Ali, Utomo, Junus — An empirical study of gamification impact on e-Learning environment, 2013

Komang Wastawan — INCREASING STUDENTS’ READING COMPREHENSION THROUGH MAKE A MATCH TYPE OF COOPERATIVE LEARNING AT FIRST GRADE OF SMA, 2014

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