Note: this article is a republishing of an article I wrote nearly a year ago on Coding the Image. I leave it here for posterity’s sake.

James Campbell tweeted the other day about how social photography (as shared on Instagram, EyeEm and other such mobile photo networks) seems to be defined by the presence (or absence) of positive engagement. Social photography, he argued, disallowed negative critique almost by design, limiting most users’ interactions with works down to a simple ‘like’. …


Note: this article is a republishing of an article I wrote almost two years ago on Coding the Image. I leave it here for posterity’s sake. (Sadly, much of it still applies today.)

I think there’s something fundamentally broken about how we work with mobile photographs today.

Take a look at how a large majority of people might deal with photographs on a smartphone. We capture pictures using the in-built camera app, automatically adding it to an infinite camera roll where every single photo we’ve ever taken on our phone resides. We’ll open each one up (one at a time)…


Note: this article is a republishing of an article I wrote two years ago on Coding the Image. I leave it here for posterity’s sake.

If you’ve been anywhere near the internet these past couple of weeks, you’ve probably seen this viral video of a collection of complete strangers kissing each other. Most likely, you found out about it from someone sharing it on their Facebook page, perhaps with a comment about how even in our materialistic, consumerist world, we can still find beauty and genuine emotion in simple moments such as these.

As we all know now, it turned…

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