Podcast: Help Facebook support the web

The domination of the web by Facebook is just as much a problem for bloggers as it is for journalists. Fact.

People want to read stuff in Facebook, they do — it’s great, but when our stuff appears there, the links to pages on the web are missing. And if we use a little styling in the post, like bold or italic, that’s gone too. No titles and no ability to include a podcast.

Facebook says “But it works in mobile through Instant Articles, and that’s where everyone reads these days.”

Yes. But I want these features in the web version of Facebook. Because we’re talking about the web, where web writers work. It’s like D’oh. It finally dawned on me that’s the bug.

I think most users are aware there’s a problem but have trouble expressing what the problem is. I am very focused on it because I’ve been developing new blogging software for the web. I want to cross-post on Facebook without losing the links, styling, titles, and enclosures. That’s it. That’s the problem. Once Facebook supports this, the problem goes away and we can stop bothering them. Until it’s solved we will watch the web continue to decline, and a very good art, linking, will diminish. I’m sure Facebook doesn’t want to cause this, but they are causing it just the same.

The blogosphere does amazing things. Little wonder the amazingness is slowing down these days because we’re being cut off from our air supply — readers. Mobile isn’t everything. For the web, it’s the web that matters. Just give us the features of IA in the web version of FB and we’re happy campers.

Call to action

In this 15-minute podcast there are three calls to action.

1. If you’re the person who decides whether or not to add web support to FB posts, please do it. You’ll be happy you did. I promise.

2. If you’re a technology influencer please support this effort to convince Facebook to open itself up to the open web through linking, style, titles and podcasting.

3. No matter who you are please listen to the podcast. It’s a good story. Just 15 minutes.

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