Does American law define “reasonable doubt”…?!
Sarah Balfour
1

Susan, you’re mistaken about “reasonable doubt” not applying in UK courts. It does. See this link: http://www.crim.cam.ac.uk/research/beyond_reasonable_doubt/

Reasonable doubt has been used in both UK and US law for hundreds of years. The above link explains the defining factors. Since juries in both the US and the UK have been convicting or acquitting defendants for hundreds of years under the reasonable doubt standard I must respectfully disagree with your notion that there is no such thing as reasonable doubt. There are fixed definitions that judges give to juries before they retire to reach their verdict.

Juries in Scotland do not find a defendant innocent any more than they do in the US. They either find them guilty beyond a reasonable doubt or they acquit, just like in the U.S.

The issue of capital punishment is a completely separate one. That’s not a question of guilt but one of punishment and it’s not a topic in any way related to my article.

— David Grace