Ever since I played Auralux all those years ago I’ve been keenly interested in what I like to call “essence” games. They are, as their name would imply, extremely stripped down games that focus on the core of their genre, doing away with many of the deeper mechanics in favour of incredibly solid fundamentals. Of course there aren’t many of these kinds of games around, I can think of maybe 3 I’ve played total over the years, but they’re always great to use as internal reference points when comparing other games in the genre. …

I’ve come to realise that I’ve had an unconscious bias against sequels that are, essentially, more of the same. I think this is because I’ve never been a “one game” kind of person, always playing a variety of titles across different genres rather than spending countless hours on one. Even during my MMORPG heydays I was still playing a bunch of other games with my mates, even if it wasn’t to the extent that I do now, especially since I committed to doing 1 game review per week all those years ago. So that meant that games that were more…

So one of the reasons that I continue these reviews is mostly to give myself a check on how I’m feeling about a game now vs when I was actually playing it. I’ve found that, over time, my views of games tend to drift a good ways away from what I originally thought, quite often due to relaxing my low information diet on games once I’ve completed them and written the review. Case in point, going into the new Resident Evil I wasn’t particularly enthused, thinking I was likely in for a slog fest like I was with the previous…

There’s a lot to be said for games that are more than the sum of their parts. The games that truly shine are the ones that are able to take expertise from many different disciplines and blend them together seamlessly, each part effectively giving more to the whole because of its interconnection with everything else. Then there are the games where, individually, the elements are strong but there’s a lack of connection between them which makes for a good, but not great, game. …

I’m sure fans of Hitman are well aware that it’s latest release has been out for quite some time but if you’re like me you’ve probably been sleeping on it for some time. That wasn’t out of any conscious thought though, more to the fact that it’s exclusivity on the Epic Games store meant that I simply wasn’t aware that it was actually released until a month or so ago when I finally got around to building my new rig and reinstalled all my various game stores again. Indeed Hitman 3 was the first game (well, apart from DOTA 2…)…

After over 6 years of faithful service I’ve retired my old rig and am now the proud owner of a flashy new AMD Ryzen system sporting a RTX 3070 (along with a whole new suite of peripherals, including a new Alienware 38" ultrawide). After putting it through the usual paces to ensure that everything was working correctly I wanted to throw a few games that really stressed the old rig out to see how they fared on the new, sleeker system. Coincidentally I had just finished my playthrough of Outriders and figured it’d be a solid comparison, even if it…

Is it just me, or did mobile games kinda fade into the background somewhat? Like, rewind say 5 years or so and I was getting mobile game recommendations from everyone, even people who didn’t really consider themselves gamers at all. These days though? Nothing, and whenever I’ve gone through the play store to find something I’ve always come up empty handed. Even stranger too is the behaviour that went along with them (I.E. whipping out your phone to whittle away 5 to 10 minute chunks whenever you had them spare) is gone too, possibly filled with idle Reddit and YouTube…

Boy, going in blind on games can be a real rollercoaster road sometimes. What started out as just me trying to eliminate outside bias from my reviews turned into a kind of ritual that I’ve just kept up, even though I know now that it’s pretty hard to avoid externalities given I’m, you know, in the scene. But sometimes just enough information makes it my way to pique my interest, but not enough that I know what to expect. Such is the case with Before Your Eyes, ostensibly a review bait game for me (indie, story heavy, some quirky mechanic)…

The Early Access survival/base building genre seems to have a pretty well trodden path these days. You start off with the base game and then release chapters/technology tiers/any other progression mechanic on a semi-regular drip until you get to the point where you call it feature complete. This development method does have some drawbacks though, namely for those of us who like to come into games when they’re fully formed there’s a lot of convention and understanding built up between the game’s early backers and the developers. This means some things get missed, “obvious” things aren’t really so and the…

There’s an unspoken genre of games I like to think of as “Having a Lark with your Mates”. These are games that, played by yourself, are usually pretty dull affairs, the core game loop not really being enough to sustain it for long durations. However when you get a few of your mates together and the inevitable happens (I.E. you begin to fuck about) things get a lot more fun, and suddenly the hours start passing you by before you know it. I’ve played many of these games with a core group of my friends and the latest game of…

David Klemke

General geek, game enthusiast, average coder.

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