Minimal Viable or Marketable Feature, Product or Release

Dmitriy Blinov
Sep 5, 2018 · 2 min read

MVP, MMF, MMP, MMR. What do these all stand for?

  1. MVP — minimal (or minimum) Viable Product;
  2. MMF — minimal Marketable Feature;
  3. MMP — minimal Marketable Product;
  4. MMR — minimal Marketable Release.

Let's consider them in detail in two incremental steps.

  1. MVP — is often a prototype aimed at getting a validated learning about a subset of users;
  2. MMF — is a minimal set of functions that brings value to the users. Usually as MMP/MMR;
  3. MMP = MMR1 — is a minimal set of key features that constitute a valuable product for the initial users;
  4. MMR — all consecutive minimal releases that bring new value to the users.
MVP, MMF, MMP, MMR relations

MVP

  • created with the least effort possible
  • provided to a subset of potential customers
  • to use for validated learning about them.
  • Much closer to prototypes than to the real running version of the product.

Eric Ries writes:

We must learn what customers really want, not what they say they want, not what we think they should want. We must discover whether we are on a path that will lead to growing a sustainable business.

And also in Validated learning about customers:

Validation comes in the form of data that demonstrates, that the key risks in the business have been addressed by the current product.

So, we get a validated learning by:

  • running experiments,
  • testing a new idea,
  • collecting data about it,
  • learning from it,
  • exploring a hypothesis about what customers really want
  • to find the features that they are actually interested in.

MMF

  • can be delivered,
  • has value to both the organization and the users.
  • A part of an MMR or MMP.

MMP

  • aimed at early adopters,
  • focused on the key features that will delight this core group.

MMR

  • has the smallest possible feature set — the smallest increment that
  • offers new value to users and addresses their current needs.
MVP, MMF, MMP, MMR relations and descriptions

Dmitriy Blinov

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Agile coach, Soft skills trainer, Personal coach