FACT: SENATOR RICHARD BURR VOTED TO INCREASE HIS OWN PAY SEVEN TIMES

2015: Richard Burr Voted Against An Omnibus Appropriations Bill Denying A Congressional Pay Raise. On December 18, 2015, Richard Burr voted against H.R. 2029, including “SEC. 9. ADJUSTMENTS TO COMPENSATION. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no adjustment shall be made under section 601(a) of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 (2 U.S.C. 4501) (relating to cost of living adjustments for Members of Congress) during fiscal year 2016.” According to the Congressional Research Service: “Since January 2009, the salary for Members of Congress has been $174,000. Subsequent adjustments were denied by P.L. 111–8 (enacted March 11, 2009), P.L. 111–165 (May 14, 2010), P.L. 111–322 (December 22, 2010), P.L. 112–175 (September 28, 2012), P.L. 112–240 (January 2, 2013), P.L. 113–46 (October 17, 2013), P.L. 113–235 (December 16, 2014), and P.L. 114–113 (December 18, 2015).” The measure was passed by a vote of 65–33. [Vote 339, H.R. 2029, 12/18/15; Text, H.R. 2029, 12/18/15; Congressional Research Service, 6/21/16]

2010: Richard Burr Voted Against Appropriations Bill Including Provision Blocking Any Pay Raise From Occurring Before 2013. On December 21, 2010, Richard Burr voted against motion to concur in the House Amdt. to Senate Amdt. with Amdt. №4885 to H.R. 3082. According toFactCheck.Org: “Under current law, members of Congress are subject to receive an annual cost-of-living adjustment to their salaries. The amount of the increase is determined by a formula based on private sector wages. And the adjustment happens automatically unless members pass legislation to cancel the increase. The ad cites McConnell’s vote against a 2009 appropriations bill with a provision eliminating the pay raise scheduled to take effect in 2010. And votes he cast in 2001, 2002 and 2003 to block amendments to bills that would have prevented adjustments in fiscal years 2002, 2003 and 2004, respectively. That’s all true, but the ad disregards votes McConnell cast before and since then that have denied annual pay increases…In December 2010, McConnell voted for H.R. 3082, the Continuing Appropriations and Surface Transportation Extensions Act, which, among other things, blocked any pay raise from occurring before Dec. 31, 2012.” The measure was passed by a 79–16 vote. [H.R. 3082, Vote 289, 12/21/10; FactCheck.Org, 6/21/13]

2009: Richard Burr Voted Against Appropriations Bill Including Provision Eliminating Pay Raise Scheduled To Take Effect In 2010. On March 10, 2009, Richard Burr voted against H.R. 1105. According to FactCheck.Org: “Under current law, members of Congress are subject to receive an annual cost-of-living adjustment to their salaries. The amount of the increase is determined by a formula based on private sector wages. And the adjustment happens automatically unless members pass legislation to cancel the increase. The ad cites McConnell’s vote against a 2009 appropriations bill with a provision eliminating the pay raise scheduled to take effect in 2010. And votes he cast in 2001, 2002 and 2003 to block amendments to bills that would have prevented adjustments in fiscal years 2002, 2003 and 2004, respectively. That’s all true, but the ad disregards votes McConnell cast before and since then that have denied annual pay increases.” The measure was passed by a 62–35 vote. [H.R. 1105, Vote 96, 3/10/09; FactCheck.Org, 6/21/13]

2002: Burr Supported Congressional Pay Raise, Voted to Raise His Own Pay by $4,700 in 2002. In 2002, Burr voted to raise his own pay by $4,700 to $154,700. Burr voted in favor of a motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on adoption of the rule to provide for House floor consideration of the bill that would appropriate $35.1 billion in fiscal 2003 Treasury-Postal appropriations. If the motion had been defeated, an amendment to block the Congressional pay raise would have been allowed. The motion passed 258–156. [H. Res. 488, Vote 322, 7/18/02]

· HEADLINE — House Clears Way for $5K Pay Raise. [AP, 7/18/02]

· HEADLINE — Lawmakers Give Themselves Pay Increase to $155,000. [Roll Call, 7/22/02]

· “In Effect, Vote to Order Previous Question Was a Vote to Accept a Pay Raise.”According to the Congressional Research Service, “By agreeing to order the previous question, Members voted not to consider an amendment to permit a pay raise prohibition amendment to be offered. Had the House not agreed to a motion to order the previous question, a Member could have offered an amendment to the rule permitting a pay raise vote in some form. Under the terms of H.Res. 488, as adopted, an amendment seeking to halt the pay raise was not in order. In effect a vote to order the previous question (and not allow any amendment to the rule) was a vote to accept a pay increase.” [Congressional Research Service, Salaries of Members of Congress: Congressional Votes, p.20–21]

2000: Burr Voted To Move Forward With Congressional Pay Raise. In 2000, Burr voted in favor of a motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on adoption of the rule to provide for House floor consideration of the bill that would appropriate $31.7 billion in fiscal 2001 for the Treasury Department, U.S. Postal Service, various offices of the Executive Office of the President and certain independent agencies. According to Congressional Research Service, “By agreeing to order the previous question, Members voted not to consider an amendment to permit a pay raise prohibition amendment to be offered. Had the House not agreed to a motion to order the previous question, a Member could have offered an amendment to the rule related to the pay adjustment.” The motion passed 250–173. [CQ Floor Votes, 7/20/00; H Res. 560, Vote 419, 7/20/00; CRS Report, 4/15/15]

· Associated Press: “Members Of Congress Seem On The Road To Giving Themselves Their Third Cost-Of-Living Pay Raise In Four Years, A $3,800 Boost[.]” “Members of Congress seem on the road to giving themselves their third cost-of-living pay raise in four years, a $3,800 boost made less politically risky in this era of huge projected budget surpluses. On a 250–173 procedural vote, House opponents of the boost lost their opportunity to derail the increase Thursday. Under a law they passed in 1989, members of Congress automatically get a raise unless they vote to block it.” [Associated Press, 7/21/00]

1998: Richard Burr Voted Against An Omnibus Appropriations Bill That Contained A Provision Denying Members Of Congress A 3.1 Percent Pay Raise. On October 20, 1998, Richard Burr voted against H.R. 4328. According to the Congressional Research Service: “1999 Members did not receive the scheduled January 1, 1999, 3.1% pay adjustment. The salary for Senators and Representatives remained $136,700.64 Actions on Annual Adjustment Scheduled for 1999 The conference version of H.R. 4104, the FY1999 Treasury, Postal Service, and General Government Appropriations bill, with a pay increase prohibition, was incorporated in the FY1999 Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act (H.R. 4328, P.L. 105–277)…10/20/98 — The House agreed (333–95, vote #538) to the conference report accompanying H.R. 4328, the FY1999 Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations bill, with the pay prohibition language.” The conference report was agreed to by a vote of 333–95. [Vote 538, H.R. 4328, 10/20/98; Congressional Research Service, 6/21/16]

1996: Richard Burr Voted Against An Omnibus Appropriations Bill That Contained A Provision Denying Members Of Congress A 2.3 Percent Pay Raise. On September 28, 1996, Richard Burr voted against the conference report of H.R. 3610. According to the Congressional Research Service: “1997 Members did not receive the annual pay adjustment of 2.3% scheduled for January 1, 1997, as a consequence of the votes taken in 1996. The salary of Members remained $133,600. Actions on Annual Adjustment Scheduled for 1997 The conference version of H.R. 3756 (the FY1997 Treasury and General Government…09/28/96 — The House agreed (370–37, vote #455) to the conference report on H.R. 3610, the Omnibus Continuing Appropriations bill, FY1997, which contained a pay freeze provision. Appropriations bill), with a pay adjustment prohibition, was incorporated into the FY1997 Omnibus Continuing Appropriations Act (H.R. 3610, P.L. 104–208).” The conference report was agreed to by a 370–37 vote. [Vote 455, H.R. 3610,9/28/96; Congressional Research Service, 6/21/16]