How to Say Goodbye to your Jujube?

A guide to parting with your beloved but excessive collection of diaper bags

Introduction

First of all, I would like to thank all those who have taken the time to read my blog entries. I am quite surprised by the attention and positive feedback that I have received.

When I first decided to blog about my quest to minimalism, I was bracing myself for some serious backlash. I was prepared to be lambasted by criticism and cynicism. So far, I have not encountered any overt signs of either. In fact,many mummies have come to me asking me for pointers on how to ‘detox’ – to rid themselves of their addiction to mummy apparel (e.g. Jujube, Oscha, Lularoe, Tula)

I do not think I am adequately trained to advice on this. I can only speak from experience. Perhaps the following pointers will help you in your process of ‘detoxing’:


1) Destash quickly

One common question that many mummies have asked me is: “Why not hold on to your Jujube bags and destash slowly? Wouldn’t you make more money back? Your rapid destashing is so wasteful.”

Both Fumio Sasaki (author of Goodbye Things) and Marie Kondo (author of Spark Joy) recommend discarding quickly.

Book Cover of Goodbye Things by Fumio Sasaki.

This is why – Selling your belongings can be a very painful process. Not only must you part with your belongings, the act of dealing with countless buyers is plain exhausting. I recall negotiating with countless potential buyers on Carousell, answering their endless questions (some of them quite offensive), meeting them in person (some were very late) and having them inspect my belongings in front of my eyes for defects.

The whole process was incredibly uncomfortable, especially when it had to be repeated over and over again. At some point, I came to the realisation that the bags actually cost me so much more than the amount I paid for them. They cost me the time and effort and patience required to sell them.

When I finally came upon that realisation, something changed inside of me. I lost my desire for the bags.

Destashing thus has to be done quickly. Yes you can expect some monetary losses now but the savings will come in later when you have gained enough self control to stop making senseless purchases.

In fact, both Fumio Sasaki and Marie Kondo recommend discarding or donating your belonging away if the selling process becomes too long drawn out and/or too laborious.

That said, I still find the pain of selling quite therapeutic. Perhaps you can consider the ‘zero returns’ route after you have undergone sufficient pains in selling.

2) When Tempted to Buy, Go for a Walk instead

One reason why Jujube, Tula, Oscha and Lularoe succeeded in engaging the mummy crowd is because they are all sold online.

Mummies, who are often trapped at home or at work need not leave their dwellings to indulge in their shopping spree. They can simply access the websites and purchase the merchandises exactly where they are.

If this is true for you, when you begin to observe an overwhelming desire to shop, I recommend that you leave your phone and/or laptop aside and go out for a walk instead. If you have a baby, push him out in the pram. Go for a walk, appreciate the beauty of nature. Return home or back to the office only after you have calmed down.

3) Consider the Opportunity Cost

For me, the opportunity cost for keeping up with my shopping habits is quite simple – I will lose precious time with my son. I will probably have to relinquish my status as a stay at home mum, get a job and leave my son at infant care.

This thought is both sobering and incredibly painful. It always pulls me back on to the right track. Is this bag more important to me than my son? Obviously not.


I hope that these pointers will help you rid yourself of your excess belonging and overcome future desire to purchase more than you need.

Remember that minimalism is not about living in an empty house. It is about having just enough to live life the the fullest. Every single cent that you spend buying something you do not need traps you in a job that you may not love.

If you can live with little, you are closer to being free from the rat race. What this means is – more time for what’s truly important in your life (E.g. family, passions, God).

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