Why Minimalism?

There are many types of minimalists and many reasons to adopt minimalism. For me, my motivation was to live on as little as little as I could to sustain the lifestyle of a stay at home mother with zero income.

I was and am concerned that much of this world has taken the family unit for granted. Young people are often so dedicated to their jobs (i.e. running projects at work, keeping organisations together) that they fail to realise that the family, like any organisation, also require much time, effort and dedication to maintain.

Family maintenance – Apart from the day to day needs like cooking and cleaning, effort is also needed to organise regular dinners and birthday parties. In addition, there are softer roles like listening to gripes, offering advice and the occasional ‘shoulder to cry on’. Often, we delegate these roles to live in maids. However, no matter how proficient a live in maid is, she may not be the most suitable to fulfil the softer roles aforementioned. We need family members for that. It has been my dream to stay at home and take on these roles for as long as I can. To achieve this end, I welcomed minimalism into my life.

While there are many forms of minimalism, the method I adopted to declutter and reorganisation my home was the KonMari method taken from ‘The Life Changing Magic of Tidying’ by Marie Kondo. I laid out all my belongings on the floor and retained only those that sparked joy. The remaining belongings were folded and stored vertically for easy access. I found this method effective in tidying up my living space and honing my ability to make future purchase decisions.


Here’s a look at the built in wardrobe that I share with my husband after we decluttered.


One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.