I read Eat, Pray, Love and quite honestly found her to be a little self absorbed.:)
Gail Boenning
86

Gail, I agree that Eat, Pray, Love was self-absorbed but believe that was the point. I just wrote to you about starting my true life at 47 when I walked away from my narcissistic father. I think my next few years were similar to Eat, Pray, Love — although, certainly not as exotic and interesting! But, after years of putting myself aside for my father and then husband, I began a journey of discovering myself, much as Elizabeth Gilbert did in her book. Some, especially those who were used to the old me, thought I became selfish and self-absorbed. Self-discovery at any age requires a generous dose of self-absorption, and for those of us who go on that journey, it is usually the first and perhaps will be the only time we are focused on ourselves.

I credit The Big Magic for spurring me to write again (after many years of not writing) and for indirectly helping me to discover Medium. That book encourages you to write, or produce creatively through whatever channels you choose, no matter how good you or others think you are. I found it to be inspiring on a very real level. A level that any of us, at any stage of life and with any life circumstances, can understand and ingest. I also have it in my Audible app, and whenever I am feeling discouraged with my writing or anything else, I listen to a few chapters, and get lifted out of my funk.

I just finished one of her earlier books (maybe her first) called Stern Men about lobster fishermen in Maine. What a quirky and strange story! I found it fascinating although others may not. Definitely, not for everyone.

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