Image for post
Image for post

“No Objection, Your Honor! Merely a Safety Concern…” — Shifting the Language to Enhance the Process

Dennis Wittrock / Klaas Reineke, Hypoport SE

There is exciting news from the hola::be circle of Hypoport SE. Based on our experiences from 27 internal Holacracy practitioner trainings we have evolved the facilitation cards for tactical and governance meetings. We changed the design, the language, the order, and the flow of the test questions, as well as framings and tips for the meeting steps. This article explains what’s new, why and what you should pay attention to in the future.

Download facilitation cards for tactical and governance

German version of this article

Changes in the Governance Card

Subtle language practice — changes in the terminology for governance

We changed some language and the name of a process step. What was previously called “Objection Round” we now simply call “Safety Check of the Proposal” ­– because that is what it is after all. This explanation has been part of our framing for the Objection Round for quite a while. Instead of having to explain it, again and again, we simply decided to change the name of the step itself. …

Image for post
Image for post

The OMG Circle App („Organisation, Mensch, Gemeinschaft“) v2.0

This Governance application is designed to address a common tension that is experienced when working within a Holacracy®-powered company. By separating “role” and “soul” and offering a clear home for the work to live in circles and roles, practicing Holacracy inevitably raises the question of what to do with people- and community-related matters. Where can those kinds of tensions be addressed? Clearly, without people energizing the organizational roles, we wouldn’t get work done. And where there’s two or more of them (us!) coming together, questions of interpersonal matters, cultural expectations, norms, and values, as well as the management of the relationship between the individual and the organization need to be consciously dealt with. …

Image for post
Image for post

The OMG Circle App („Organisation, Mensch, Gemeinschaft“) v2.0

This Governance application is designed to address a common tension that is experienced when working within a Holacracy®-powered company. By separating “role” and “soul” and offering a clear home for the work to live in circles and roles, practicing Holacracy inevitably raises the question of what to do with people- and community-related matters. Where can those kinds of tensions be addressed? Clearly, without people energizing the organizational roles, we wouldn’t get work done. And where there’s two or more of them (us!) coming together, questions of interpersonal matters, cultural expectations, norms, and values, as well as the management of the relationship between the individual and the organization need to be consciously dealt with. …

Image for post
Image for post
Image credits: Conceptual illustration of a designer cell sensing a target cell (by Ryo Tachibana), combined with a photo of earth.

How to Overcome Humanity’s Immune Reaction to Acting on Climate Goals and How to Craft a More Inspiring Story

Every generation has its defining crisis. In the 1980s we had the prospect of global thermonuclear war looming. Luckily, that particular doomsday scenario never became a reality. But it was pretty damn close, I was told. These days the number one worry-inducing topic is Climate Change. Or as The Guardian recently put it:

Outside of the desperate and the deluded, everyone knows that the world is in the early stages of a truly catastrophic climate change. As Sir David Attenborough told the UN climate change conference in Poland, “the collapse of our civilisations and the extinction of much of the natural world is on the horizon”. We have even worked out, with scrupulous care, what we must do to avoid this or to mitigate the effects of climate change. We know what to do. We can see how to do it. There’s only one problem: we do almost nothing. …

Image for post
Image for post
“When you run after your thoughts, you are like a dog chasing a stick. Every time a stick is thrown, you run after it. Instead, be like a lion who, rather than chasing after the stick, turns to face the thrower. One only throws a stick at a lion once.” -Milarepa

I will start this on a personal note. I am nearly 40 years old, but it was only recently, 5 months ago, that I landed my first proper employment contract at my current company, Hypoport. In the two decades before that, I was very busy avoiding the corporate world. I excelled at school, but I wasn’t particularly eager to go working at some company, so I used my years at university to figure out what I wanted to do in this world, what really resonated with my core values, what this whole life thing is about. I ended up studying philosophy and it took me 8 years to finish it. I would frequently get questions like: “What do you want to do with it afterward?” — My standard answer was “Become a taxi-driver” — kind of a running gag. I guess finishing my degree was simply a socially acceptable way of procrastinating the decision of where to work. Needless to say, it freaked out my parents. So yeah, 8 years to become a taxi-driver. …

Image for post
Image for post

An Alternative Small Talk Question

When you are entering a new social arena at a party or in other situations where small talk is expected to circumvent periods of awkward silence, one of the standard questions usually is “What do you do for a living?” The function of this harmless question is to get to know the other person on a superficial level, usually in order to create potential segways for deepening a conversation — or not. It also serves as a quick way to gauge the social status as a person, its net worth and generally enables us to categorize our conversation partner into one of our pre-formed mental boxes. It serves our ego to reduce complexity in a busy world. …

Image for post
Image for post

Encoding the Future of Work

Social Entrepreneurs often start off with an idea of how to solve a fundamental human problem in a new way. In order to scale their work to make a bigger positive impact in the world, sooner or later they need to build an organization and make it profitable.

In this they are confronted with standard business problems of how to structure the work in an efficient way. They can either go the traditional way of top-down predict-and-control management or choose a structure that is more aligned with the New World of Work.

In our view there are five core principles that characterize the New World of Work: purposeful, holarchic, autonomous, dynamic and transparent.

Image for post
Image for post

Dear encode.org followers,

this is our first letter via Medium. We will inform you from time to time about interesting new content pieces through this channel.

We’ve just released a new blogpost that you might find interesting

Five Markers of the New World of Work

purposeful, holarchic, autonomous, dynamic, and transparent

read the full blog post here (3 min read)

Image for post
Image for post
You don’t need to be a Jedi to work differently — although it might help…

If you are also interested in more general announcements, news, workshops, and webinars feel free to sign up for our main newsletter here.

Have a great day!

Dennis

-Writer at encode.org

Image for post
Image for post

A Playbook for What’s Next

Marker 1): purposeful

Image for post
Image for post
Purpose should not only be realized on mountaintops, btw..

Purpose is the new boss. Everything is aligned and self-organized around nested purposes that encompass each other. While following my own personal purpose I also fulfill the organization’s purpose and vice versa.

Marker 2): holarchic

Image for post
Image for post
Nature is holarchic, too.

Conventionally, power is being held personally. Holacracy changed our thinking around getting the work done without people hierarchy. In the New World of Work power hierarchies get replaced with natural hierarchies of purpose.

Marker 3): autonomous

Image for post
Image for post
Be a Ferrari!

In the New World of Work we are not seeking for permission. Anything that is not explicitly forbidden is allowed — until it gets restricted. …

Image for post
Image for post

How Holacracy is Similar to Mindfulness-Practice

Ever since Eugen Herrigel’s popular book “Zen in the Art of Archery” the magic formula “Zen in the art of…” has entered the pantheon of ready-made, catchy titles. So here’s another one. The inspiration hit me when reading the book “The Science of Enlightenment” by contemporary American Zen Buddhist teacher and ‘dharma geek’, Shinzen Young. In this article I apply his pearls of wisdom to the organizational realm, to the practice of Holacracy, and the For-Purpose Enterprise — exploring commonalities between them.

A Tangled Mess

Image for post
Image for post

To begin with, it is important to understand one of the major insights of the historical Buddha. After having practiced and mastered the available meditative practices of his time, the Buddha developed a new path, Vipassana, or insight meditation. The pioneering aspect of this particular kind of practice was that it helped to build a capacity which Shinzen Young calls “sensory clarity”. …

About

Dennis Wittrock

Integral pioneer from Germany. Holacracy Coach at Hypoport. Partner at encode.org. Co-founder Integral European Conference. Father. Brother. Son. Human.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store