Image for post
Image for post

I study nuclear research ethnographically and historically: how do researchers and communities make sense of their work relative to long time horizons and uncertain outcomes? I started writing these texts — two pieces of creative non-fiction and one poem — after a conversation about the ways that my interlocutors engage with and relate to their physical lab spaces as material culture. I was particularly struck by how scientists at Department of Energy (DOE) labs understand the security and surveillance measures mandated by their funding agencies. While these researchers certainly place a high value on their work (and any safety concerns…


Image for post
Image for post
The cover of the most recent edition (from Penguin Random House)

Last week I was zooming with my mentor and, at one point during the conversation, we discussed my recent realization that I don’t fit into the gender binary. I’ve come to understand myself as non-binary (“enby”) or genderqueer (see https://pflag.org/glossary for more info). As often happens, our conversation also touched on science fiction and books we’d been reading. She asked if I knew Ursula K. Le Guin’s classic, The Left Hand of Darkness (1969). I’ve heard of it (and been recommended it) but hadn’t read it yet. I decided to take the pandemic as an opportunity to finally read it…

Taylor Parrott

ex-academic (physics -> science history/policy) working in harm reduction. they/them

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store