Source: Kubernetes.io

If Kubernetes has one superpower, I might argue it’s providing a standard abstraction on which software vendors can design their products to run. Yeah, there are all the benefits of container orchestration and reliability and DevOps and what have you, but there will always tools to facilitate those things. However, having a standard platform on which to deploy software? Well, that could open the world for enterprise startups in the same way that infrastructure as a service did a decade ago.

I should note that the idea of Kubernetes as a standard application platform is not novel: I had Replicated…


Igor Jablovov

In this episode of the Architecht Show, Pryon founder and CEO Igor Jablokov explains how his company makes it easier for enterprises to access their important data by utilizing augmented intelligence and efficient language models. He also discusses where AI is headed both in the enterprise and in our personal lives thanks to advances in models, chip architectures, and more.

Follow Igor on Twitter at @ijablokov.

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In this episode of the Architecht Show, Hex Technologies co-founder and CEO Barry McCardel talks about how his company is attempting to simplify the data science workflow — notebooks, collaboration, storytelling, sharing, you name it. And with a focus on security, something for which the founding team developed an affinity during their time at Palantir. McCardel also discusses the (hopefully) novel experience of growing an early-stage startup during a pandemic.

Follow Barry on Twitter at @barrald.

How to listen to the ARCHITECHT Show everywhere else

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Tim Delisle (Source: Scale By the Bay)

In this episode of the Architecht Show, Datalogue co-founder and CEO Tim Delisle discusses how his company is trying to remake data integration for large enterprises, by taking advantage of Kubernetes, good UX, and a focus on performance and security. Delisle also shares his take on why the big data movement might have missed the boat.

Follow Tim on Twitter at @timgdelisle.

How to listen to the ARCHITECHT Show everywhere else

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Photo by Jonny Caspari on Unsplash

This is really a draft of a post that I am never going to finish, because I can’t figure out exactly what I want to say. But I believe it’s true at its core. Correct me where I’m wrong, or just ignore it :)

Enterprise IT can seem a little boring these days. Not boring like bad TV, but boring like local legislation. It’s important — more important than ever, in fact — and yet it can feel like you need to be a domain expert (or political wonk) to keep up. …


In this episode of the (newly relaunched) Architecht Show, I spoke with Adam Chekroud (co-founder and chief product officer of Spring Health) about the world of mental health care for employees. We discuss Spring Health’s data-based approach to getting users connected—quickly—with the right solutions and the right professionals for their specific needs, as well as the overall state of mental health in a world often dominated by social media, information overload, and, lately, pandemic and civil unrest.

You can find out more about Spring Health on its website. Follow Adam on Twitter at @itschekkers.

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Grant Miller

In the first episode of the newly relaunched Architecht Show podcast, I spoke with Grant Miller (co-founder and CEO of Replicated) about many things—but mostly the emerging business for what he calls Kubernetes-Off-The-Shelf software, or KOTS. That is, SaaS offerings and even traditional installed software being delivered as packages that run on Kubernetes clusters—on-premises or on public cloud instances—and are managed like other Kubernetes applications.

To hear more about what Grant and Replicated are up to (including spearheading various open source projects), you can visit the company’s website. …


I spent a lot of time covering Hadoop during my time at Gigaom, and then the evolution of Hadoop and the companies behind it while I was managing this site on a regular basis. So as I watched that space more or less evaporate over the past year especially, I often found myself thinking about what happened. I wrote a post touching on some of these themes last October when the Cloudera-Hortonworks merger was announced, but this one fleshes things out a bit.

Also, on an unrelated note, I’m presently managing a site called Intersect as part of my role…


Kelsey Hightower. Source: HashiCorp

In this episode of the ARCHITECHT Show, Kelsey Hightower — Google staff engineer, senior developer advocate and all-around cloud-native superstar — talks about his journey into cloud-native computing techniques and how he uses what he’s learned to help companies make the right decisions for their needs. Among many other topics, Hightower gives his thoughts on open source startups, Kubernetes, serverless computing, and the importance of spending time with technologies (even competitive ones) before offering opinions on them.

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Mike Tung (center) with team Diffbot in August 2018. Source: Diffbot

In this episode of the ARCHITECHT Show, Diffbot CEO Mike Tung talks all about the value, workings and business of knowledge graphs, and how Diffbot grew its graph to around 1 trillion interconnected facts. Knowledge graphs are critical to many aspects of our digital lives — including smart assistants and web web search — and have value across industries ranging from retail to intelligence. Tung also explains the relationship between knowledge graphs and AI, and why crawling and structuring the web’s countless facts is a compute-intensive job.

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Derrick Harris

Founder/editor/writer of ARCHITECHT. Day job is at Pivotal. You might know me from Gigaom - way back in the day, now.

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