Why I learned to code

Imagine walking into a library and not being able to read. That is how I feel to be living in this age of information and data without being able to code. Data is everywhere, hence information is everywhere.

I work in tech, and as such I am privy to common knowledge (in the tech world) that many people are not aware of. Do you know I could reach out (into the internet) and pull together a very decent profile of everyone who is/has been in my vicinity with relative ease? People who “check-in”, or post messages using Geo-location on their phone, for example, are fair game online. A cross reference here and there and I have a decent file on you. Especially if you have a unique identifier (like a telephone number).

Snooping is of very little interest to me. But I do like the idea of being able to use code to gather information and empower me to make decisions. Small scripts (of code) — which can even be considered simple robots — are not difficult to create and can run a whole slew of boring tasks for you: searching for an apartment, ordering regular deliveries and so on. And once the Fridge starts to join the conversation, being able to “boss” my appliances around makes code even more appealing. (Right now, my Fridge is deaf and mute, but soon, oh so soon…)

I decided that code is important and learned to code. Except, like any language, it’s difficult to become “fluent”. It requires constant practice. So, I continue to study, and write minimal scripts, and sharpen my fluency, as I wait for the day when I find writing code as easy as writing these sentences, and I watch the world turn around me, and I say “wow, did I really make that happen?”.

update: I found this link which just about sums up how awesome it is to be able to code: https://blog.howdy.ai/lunch-hacks-fde6099b3ad9#.5mttfwy8s

This is what I’m talking about!

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