FinTech UX Review: Brolly

Will Brolly revolutionise the insurance market?

Brolly is the UK’s first personal insurance concierge powered by AI.

With Brolly, customers can better understand whether they’re over insured or under insured and where they can get a better price for the cover they need.

Brolly users only need to enter their information once, and purchasing new cover will be achieved with one simple tap. Brolly will also help manage all insurance policies in one place, and provide instant access to your documents, prices, and contact numbers, so they’re always at hand when you need them.

Beta versions of Brolly Locker and Brolly Advisor were launched in the App Store late 2016 — We spent some time earlier last month test driving the initial limited beta experience.

Brolly believe “It’s insurance — but simple.” So just how ‘simple’ is it?

ONBOARDING

In previous articles I have detailed the importance of the onboarding process and what effect this will have on the overall success, or failure, of an app. This is no different for Brolly.

The information needed to create an account is minimal, which is what we have come to expect from modern onboarding processes; names, email address and password. I was then placed into a queue to receive access, once this was granted it was easy to pick back up the onboarding process from where I left off.

An impressive feature of Brolly is the ability to integrate with an email account. This integration will analyse and automatically find insurance policies, which will be added to the Brolly Locker. This is currently only the case if you have Gmail, which has recently announced they have passed 1 billion monthly active users worldwide. For the rest of us who don’t have a Gmail account, there are other options further in the process to add policy details.

After a number of questions around living situations and possessions (I’m assuming the answers to these questions affect which available insurance products are displayed — if not, I can’t see any reasonable explanation why a user would have to answer these as part of onboarding), it’s time to select which insurance products need to be added. These are then added to the Brolly Locker for information to be added. If no information is added, an automated email is sent, followed up with a gentle reminder a few days later.

Brolly Onboarding

Aesthetically, there is a lot of use of colour, with nearly every screen a different colour from the last. It feels a little bit jarring moving from one screen to the next, and I’m initially thinking about why each screen is a different colour, rather than concentrating on providing answer to the questions.

BROLLY LOCKER

Brolly Locker

Brolly’s vision is to redesign the insurance user experience based on a centralised approach to the UI/UX of insurance policies. Brolly Locker is the only place you’ll need to store all of your insurance policies, from every insurance provider you’ve ever purchased from. So your policy documents, renewal dates, premiums, and contact numbers are always there when you need them. And when you purchase insurance through Brolly Shop, they’ll be stored in your Brolly Locker immediately.

Having selected Buildings & Contents, Motor and Pet during onboarding, these are now pending items in my Locker, ready and waiting for policy details to be added. If you then want to delete a pending product, this is available after selecting ‘Upload’, which is slightly counter intuitive.

Another option is to forward insurance policy emails to a generic Brolly email address, which I assume will be done manually as this is the same address for contacting Brolly (team@heybrolly.com).

The manual entry process is straightforward and requires the minimal information about a base policy. This process could have been improved with selections e.g. selecting an insurance company rather than manually entering one into a free text field, this would also limit any errors/incorrect insurance companies. More attention to detail with currency values is also needed, adding a ‘£’ to the annual premium screen caused an error, the message displayed was not relevant to that screen.

With the exception of the small issues that need ironing out, this process is capturing the key details for a base policy, but my initial thoughts are more detail is needed to be able to use the information to compare my cover or tell me if I’m over/under insured, for example I’ve not been asked if I have Home Emergency cover as part of my home insurance.

After adding Motor, Buildings & Contents and Pet policy details I’m presented with a total Annual Insurance Spend and a bar graph, using two shades of red and green — it’s taken longer than it should to work out the 2 shades of red are related to products. I instantly thought this was representing there was an issue somewhere with a policy e.g. I’m paying too much, or it’s expiring. The order of the bar chart colours doesn’t match the order of the products.

A real benefit of having this locker is that it’s really easy to see which insurance provider I have for which product. In a world where a large number of people change their insurance companies annually to get the best price and having worked for an insurance company before, I know first hand that a lot of people forget who they currently have insurance with — this will never happen with Brolly.

BROLLY ADVISOR

Brolly Advisor is a tool that analyses the cover that has been added to Brolly Locker, and is able to see if you’re over or under insured, whether you have duplicate or missing cover, and highlights all of the personal insurance products that you may be missing. e.g. when I completed my profile and made Brolly aware I had children, I was recommended Life cover as a high priority.

The idea is that using Advisor it will be easy to select a product that that is not currently covered and retrieve a quote, or decline the need for a certain cover. I’m still not sure how this is going to be possible with just the basic information I have entered so far in this beta version — Brolly is either going to have to ask more information about existing policies/profile information, or ask more questions when getting a quote — which seems to go against the idea of just entering information once.

Brolly Advisor

Also, what Brolly is unable to do, is dig deeper into an existing insurance policy to see if some of the recommendations are already in place. A lot of home insurance providers have Home Emergency cover as an additional option, but Brolly is totally unaware if this is part of an existing policy, and therefore is suggesting this isn’t covered.

The design patterns used within the Advisor are starting to become convoluted too — It is possible to edit your checklist via a big green areas. But as you drill down into more information about a cover, these same big green areas are being used for headings.

OVERALL

As this is only the beta testing version there are obviously still some issues, but we think the idea behind Brolly is a great one and it’s exciting to see FinTech startups moving the industry forward. We are looking forward to reviewing the next release of Brolly where functionality will allow users to purchase insurance.