Ecology and Homes — What Do They Have in Common

It is quite trendy to care about the environment nowadays. There’s plenty of outrage towards companies, which disregard the need to preserve the planet we live on and to be fair, outrage is indeed necessary. We cannot let our only home (at least for now) be turned into a dump of sorts. But what happens is that we blame companies and corporations, but we rarely think about how we can improve our local environment. Recycling is by now part of everyday life for most people, at least in the cities. We’ve trained our minds to embrace it and not think about it — metal, plastic, wood and paper need to be recycled. The same applies to water and several other resources. And that’s good, it has dampened the harm we do, at least a bit. But what about other parts of our lives. How do we accommodate ecology there? We don’t, really.

The sad situation is that we rarely consider other opportunities and options when it comes to the major part of our lives. We don’t think how we can better the places we live in. Not our cities, but rather our homes. Did you know for example that there is the complete possibility to turn your home into a self-sustainable power plant of sorts? You have probably never thought about that. But you can. Scientists have developed a quite interesting piece of technology — windows, which are actually solar panels. They have even invented outdoor devices which can harvest wind and turn it into electricity — and no, I am not talking about wind turbines. At least not the ones you think of when you hear the term.

Ecology has now a lot to do with homes. Your place of living can be a self-sustainable ecosystem if you want to invest in such a thing. And this is not some fanatical person telling you that. I have considered moving to a new home, but I didn’t know what I was looking for. However, spending some time to research eco-friendly options, I’ve come to the conclusion that this is a rather impressive and profitable investment. Did you know you can actually sell the harvested energy if you have excess? You totally can, the government even buys eco-energy. You can also work out a tax break, because of your efforts to preserve nature.

Knowing all that, at some point I was just certain that we need to move to such a place. I lived in Chicago, but was perfectly open to just move to a nice suburb, which can suit my need. I hired a moving company and arranged everything, and now my family and I are living in a self-sustainable building. We own a percentage of it and sell a bit of the energy, and it actually works out pretty well. I won’t go as far as saying that I am now making a business out of it and don’t need to work anymore, and money is just flooding my home. Nothing of the sorts, but knowing I actually help the environment and it doesn’t even cost me that much — this adds joy to my life for certain.