From Darkness to Light: C.G. Jung and the Trickster

He is a bridge, or even a waterfall, between the subconscious urges of the animalistic, primitive, and the divine aspects of the individual. For this reason, he neither fits in to the animal life, nor the godly life, but he does point out the humour and inconsistencies of a life in ignorance of either of the two.

I really enjoyed reading Jung’s Trickster. Maybe that’s because I have read Jung’s autobiography, Memories, Dream, and Reflections, and I truly think he was a great man, way ahead of his time.

I have found (if I can slip one of these in here) that there are two types of people in this world; those who get Jung, and those who don’t. I find that mechanistic/materialistic thinkers tend to really struggle finding the relevance of Jung (and others like him, like, for example, the currently extremely polarising public intellectual Jordan B Peterson). This, I believe, is because mechanistic thinkers haven’t done the digging into their own psyche required to meet with their own shadows. And, hey, what’s the need to? If science has told you all there is to know, with its ideology of the person being collections of meaninglessly dancing marbles, what’s the use of searching for an “unconscious”? In response to that ideology, one gets to insert the question here of, why would meaningless marbles hold so strongly to the view that they are meaningless?…

Just as “nothing” is still something, “meaningless” is still meaning!

Those who do get Jung, on the other hand, tend to be non-mechanistic, idealistic, or even panpsychic, thinkers, who see the primacy of consciousness, and whom are open to the idea of spirit – or something non-perceivable empirically, objectively – being behind matter. The danger of these types of folks, though, is that they can tend to wander off into the ever-vague, New Agey, wish-washy, crystal-clutching, completely-un-backed-by-the-sciences, speculation, genre. Haha! Just see… No one is free from being made a joke of when the trickster is about! And, this is a nice segue into my reading of the trickster.

This week was my first reading into Jung’s trickster. But, I found the archetype frighteningly familiar, and super interesting. The trickster is a representation of the shadow, a “summation of all [one’s] inferior traits” in the psyche. He is a bridge, or even a waterfall, between the subconscious urges of the animalistic, primitive, and the divine aspects of the individual. For this reason, he neither fits in to the animal life, nor the godly life, but he does point out the humour and inconsistencies of a life in ignorance of either of the two. This, connecting of the dots, above and below, also makes the trickster the meaning-maker who makes meaning out of the meaningless.

Therefore, the trickster is essential for the individuation of a person, for he allows the unconscious to come to the surface, into consciousness, as it were, as well as reaching to the highest ideal of divinity. In this way the trickster, and what appears to be a pointless, reckless joke in the begging, turns out to be the saviour, for the trickster brings the hidden controlling forces out of the shadow and into consciousness, where they can be integrated into the self, and transcended, as consciousness evolves as a kind of eternal transcendence of what one was.

But, according to Jung, the trickster can only reveal the true state of the situation; catching the emperor with no close! He cannot solve the situation; for a solution cannot be found at the level of the problem – but, finding the problem is the first half of the solution! For solutions, for healing, and for perfecting one’s being, one must take shelter of the anima, according to Jung, which is hiding directly behind the shadow, and contains the archetypes of the wise sage, the magician, and the king. I would say that one’s deepest desires, which rule us through our shadow, are hiding here.

The anima allures us in different ways, often through “youthful feminine beauty”, as Jung put it, and those who are not willing to accept their feministic aspects, struggle to understand her; they strugle to meet with their anima. I encourage my readers here to look up goddesses such as Parvati, Yoga Maya, and Radharani. What does she teach? She teaches the “relatedness” of all things, she develops the consciousness, and this gradually brings about our liberation from the unconscious and into our complete individuation – from darkness to light, from void to service.

Now, that did sound super New Agey, didn’t it? Or maybe that’s just the Trickster showing his face. 🙃

Look up images of the Mercurius, the trickster. Notice that he is holding the twin snakes on a stick, which are the Greek medical symbol for healing; the Caduceus? Next thing I want to look into is the Caduceus’s relationship to Kundalini.

Read more like this at https://essenceseekers.org/

All the best on your journeys home, Essence Seekers!

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Bhakti Yogi anthropologist, living in India, writing about philosophy, history, society, cultural, lifestyle education and spirituality.

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Our Nature Eternal (ONE)

Bhakti Yogi anthropologist, living in India, writing about philosophy, history, society, cultural, lifestyle education and spirituality.