Pick your [social media] poison

This is something that I’ve long battled as an entrepreneur — the need to live a life that is edited into existence one post at a time. I get it. People need to know who you are. They need to understand your motivations. If you want investment, your investors need to see what you’re passionate about, what moves you.

Then you stop and realize — I just spent most of my day curating posts for social media, but what is my product? For someone like me, it could be argued that I am my own product and therefore have just spent a day promoting myself. Okay. Cool.

In addition to building my brand, I also have a business to run, and investments to manage, not to mention I do enjoy the occasional attempt at work-life balance. So I can’t afford to let those things slip on account of trying to keep up with 500 different social accounts. Chances are, you can’t either. If only I had a team of social media gurus to tackle it for me…but alas, I do not. And neither do most of the entrepreneurs I know.

So choose.

That’s right. Choose.

Where is the market that you’re trying to reach? As an entrepreneur, as a business, what is your goal? Do you want to reach new customers? Expand your network? Land a job?


Remember: not all platforms are created equal — and not all platforms require the same kind of content!

Most of the people I know have a Facebook account, however it isn’t my chosen medium because I know the people I wish to find are on other platforms, so why waste time pushing mediocre content? Sure, it’s possible to take a post from elsewhere and push it to other platforms. However, I firmly believe that if you’re not going to do something right, why bother. Remember: not all platforms are created equal — and not all platforms require the same kind of content!

The goal here is to have fewer, high quality posts on very targeted platforms. If you work in a visual medium, maybe Instagram is a great resource for you. If you’re an investment banker, maybe LinkedIn is where you get the most value.

Ask yourself, “what am I getting from spending time posting on this platform?” If you consistently get engagement on other platforms, ask yourself why; is your target audience there? Is the content you’re putting out appropriate for the medium? If not, reevaluate your presence and understand that your audience doesn’t exist in a vacuum. One year they may be all over Snapchat, the next they’re all about Instagram. Go where your people are. Be able to flex to them and be strong with your content and firm in your convictions.

Seek to not only derive value, but to create it. Build meaningful interactions with the people you seek. Whether they’re new prospects, current customers, or people you hope to network with, the value will be appreciated.

We are hit with content overload on a daily basis — why contribute to that problem?

A strong presence with fewer posts is far greater than a weak presence that spams people with mediocre content.

Think about it. Try it. Do it.