Yonette de Ru — Senior UX & Research, Digital of Things

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Welcome to the last part of the series where I’ve taken you on trips to galaxies far far away in the Star Wars universe. The fictional characters you’ve met along the way serve as a reference to resonate with as we unveiled the dark forces of UX that exist in our world.

So far on our journey throughout the galaxy we’ve covered 7 of these dark forces (check out part1 and part 2 of this series), and for our final discovery we’ll look at the remaining dark forces that disturb the force. …

Yonette de Ru — Senior UX & Research, Digital of Things

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In the first part of this series, I discussed what the three types of dark patterns are (click here if you have yet to read part 1). As the first post in this series was fittingly released on Star Wars day, I used the Star Wars storyline as a reference which will continue throughout the remainder of the series.

So sit back, relax and enjoy reading about the next four dark forces, paired with real-life examples AND suggestions on how to overcome them!

Let’s continue!

Yonette de Ru — Senior UX & Research, Digital of Things

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Photo by Daniel Cheung on Unsplash

Happy Star Wars Day, May the 4th be with you!

I personally love the Star Wars films for it’s creativity and storyline and decided to use it as a reference in this upcoming 3 part series which will explain and outline the existing dark patterns in the UX industry and give guidelines on how to overcome and/or avoid these dark forces.

But first, what is a dark pattern? (The dark side of UX)

Dark patterns are unethical instances where a product or service tries to trick and force users into doing things they didn’t want to do. …

Aditi Kant | Director of UX & Research, Digital of Things

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As designers and researchers, we fight our biases each day at work to be more efficient and effective in our approach to research and design. It’s important to ensure that the way data is collected along with the data itself is not impaired by an ignorance of cognitive biases, in order to provide meaningful value to our clients and customers. Being ‘blissfully unaware’ is no longer an excuse when it comes to conducting interviews and asking questions.

Listed below are examples of popular biases and the ways to overcome them. By asking better questions and becoming a more empathetic, creative and open-minded researcher, you’re getting the best possible data from your subjects. In order to become better at managing clients, or gain better data through existing research, it is crucial for both researchers and designers to have overcome their bias, and thoughtfully choose both their words and actions. …

Aditi Kant | Director of UX & Research, Digital of Things

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Eye-tracking and eye-tracking studies have been commercially used since the late 1990s, but it’s origins can be traced back to the 1800’s when ophthalmologists conducted various studies on how humans read and interpret text. My first brush with eye-tracking came along in 2002 while I was in college studying to be an Industrial Designer. Samsung set up a lab on the premises with an eye tracking facility by SensoMetric Instruments (SMI), now owned by Apple. As a part of one of my projects, I was to study the scanning patterns of the users on various posters. The eye tracking machine itself was terrorizing. Calibration of the tracker was so difficult while wearing glasses or contact lenses that I was sure I would never finish my project on time. While expressing these concerns to my professor, he (very optimistically) told me how these studies would improve as technology is evolving faster than we think, and he was right! …

Aditi Kant | Director of UX & Research, Digital of Things

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Throughout the region digital accessibility is changing year after year. As accessibility gains in popularity, many challenges are brought to light on the existing ‘accessibility condition’ here in the region. Locally, the government has enacted many initiatives to make the UAE as a whole more accessible for all people of all abilities. Despite these initiatives however, people of determination still find that their disability limits their independence. For example, businesses here are slow to develop accessible solutions for digital products — unless there is an organisational mandate. …

Brooke Cowling | Co-founder & COO, Digital of Things

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Having punched above its weight to emerge as the region’s tourism and financial hub, Dubai aims to diversify its economy further and establish itself as the GCC’s center for innovation. With LinkedIn and local recruiter research showing the best job opportunities are now in the digital sector, things look to be working. But as green shoots of growth emerge, can talent be accessed fast enough to sustain it?

The U.A.E. is rife with opportunities. Naturally, you’d want to seize these opportunities quickly by recruiting local professionals with local know-how. …

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2019 has been a good year here at Digital of Things. We had over 400 participants get involved in different forms of user research at our lab in Dubai. Based on that data, we uncovered many useful insights — but one aspect caught our eye — which was that regionally, people are hungry for digitalisation, but the unpleasant & sometimes non-existent user experience drives them to use traditional, more familiar channels like phone calls.

We had the privilege to test with over 50 nationalities living across the UAE, and pick up some great, local insights along the way. It wouldn’t be fair to keep our learnings to ourselves — so we’ve launched the 2020 shift, which features the 10 ways in which UX is evolving here and what we expect to see take off in the region. As we enter the new decade, we bring new technological capabilities, a greater digital understanding and vision for the future. …

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The e-commerce space is growing, along with its complications. Consumers continue to shift their spending and purchasing habits in order to reap the benefits of e-commerce, including the convenience of receiving products straight to their door, saving time by not having to visit a store, and finding products quickly and more easily than in-store. It’s an exciting time to be a retailer in the e-commerce space!

This shift in consumer behaviour parallels an upward shift in the number of online businesses. E-commerce may simplify shopping for consumers, but it also has several benefits for retailers. …

By Aditi Kant

While chatbots are relatively new, you might not know them as you do today without Alan Turing’s famous Turing Test, established way back in 1950. If you’re not familiar with the Turing Test, it’s a test of a machine’s ability to exhibit intelligent behaviour comparable to, or indistinguishable from, that of a human. With its creation, Alan Turing unknowingly established the foundation for chatbots. Cool right?

More recently, Facebook’s messenger service has become a widely known platform where bots interact directly with Facebook users. It may seem like messenger has been around forever, but it was only launched in 2016. Since then, there’s been no looking back. …

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Digital of Things

Hello. We’re Digital of Things and we study human behaviour in a digital world.

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