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Thanks for taking the tests. It seems we are pretty close on the spectrum, so I can give you my thoughts on where we fit in to everything. I’m not sure if you read any of my other essays on the Democratic Party — I have been writing a lot of them ☺ —but I think there are two different things going on. First, there’s where we stand politically, and then, there’s where we stand strategically. I am politically left of where I stand strategically. In other words, I think we have to have a more centrist Democratic Party than my belief system would allow in order to win in elections. I get the sense you agree.

On the other hand, I think the Democratic Party of 1992 to the present has become too conservative (e.g. trade policy, tax policy, labor policy, Social Security policy, healthcare policy, regulation policy, etc.). Most people who view the Democratic Party as too liberal do so because of its stances on social issues (e.g. reproductive health and other women’s rights, gay rights, civil rights, climate change policy, drug policy, etc.).

I don’t think we should change our stances on social issues. Let them sink into society. Let people learn to deal with this social liberalization. These are people’s rights that folks are just going to have to adjust to. I believe it will be a necessary part of the growth of humanity.

But on the economic issues. I don’t see us moving away from capitalism, and I don’t necessarily think we should (I’ve seen some amazing futurist writers like Joe Brewer who make me rethink the whole capitalism idea though). I think capitalism needs democratic socialism as a grease for its cogs to work. The question becomes how does the United States get there? I wrote an article on ways I think progressives can peacefully influence Democrats:

I don’t want to see this showdown between progressives and what they always call centrists — but really, if their policy positions are examined — they are conservatives. I would like to see the party moderate to somewhere between Bill Clinton and Franklin Roosevelt. Anyhow, that’s my thoughts.

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