Foods consumed in raw, cooked and modified form can have a dramatically different effect on each of us

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Pay attention to how your body reacts to different foods..and in the different forms you consume them in

In recent years, we have learned a lot about the harms of eating genetically modified foods (GMOs). There are, however, conflicting opinions on whether whole foods offer a greater benefit when consumed in raw or cooked form. It is not enough that we have to be thoughtful about which foods we put into our bodies. Now, we are being told that we have to consider how to eat them. For those who have or are at risk for autoimmune disease, this consideration can be even more critical.

Scientific studies show a link between GMOs and health problems, inflammation, a higher risk of disease, intestinal damage and — in extreme cases — death. Dr. Amy Myers, author of the New York Times bestseller, “The Thyroid Connection,” best explains why. First, GMOs contain more pesticides and toxins than non-GMOs. Overexposure to pesticides and environmental toxins can trigger autoimmune disease and worsen a preexisting condition. Second, GMOs can cause leaky gut, which in turn can lead to autoimmune disease, and inflammation, which aggravates the condition. Finally, GMOs can disrupt your gut microbial balance by decreasing the good bacteria and increasing the bad bacteria. In a nutshell, there is a lot of downside to making modified foods a part of your diet — especially if you suffer from autoimmune disease. …


From Sleep to Diet—Here Are Some Tips For Navigating Flu Season

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It’s that time of year when we’re all desperately avoiding the guy at the office who just got sick. While flu season can last all the way into May, January-March represent the peak of flu activity.

For anyone living with an autoimmune condition, flu season comes with added challenges. Because autoimmune diseases alter the immune system, it makes it hard for one’s system to distinguish cells from itself or foreign invaders like the flu virus, bacterial infections or other germs. …


January is an excellent time to reset how you manage your autoimmune condition

This post was contributed by a community member.

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Make time to evaluate and take care of your health to start the year if you suffer from autoimmune disease

Holiday indulgences aren’t always autoimmune friendly. For those living with autoimmune disease, a season marked by decadent meals and running around visiting family and friends can leave you struggling to keep up in the New Year.

As January unfolds in front of us, it’s imperative that anyone suffering from an autoimmune condition take steps to evaluate the impact of their holiday activities and take steps to ensure a healthy 2019.

The U.S. National Library of Medicine points out that there are over 80 different autoimmune diseases and the American Autoimmune Diseases Association puts the number at more than 100. Yet there is one common denominator when it comes to the symptoms of most of them: inflammation. The body can fluctuate between flare-ups, where symptoms get worse, and remission, where the symptoms get better or go away. …


Are You in the Driver’s Seat When it Comes to Your Health?

With so much info at our fingertips, it can be overwhelming

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It’s time to take control of your own health

Easy access to a multitude of comprehensive and specialized health resources on the Internet today allow more people to be armed with knowledge about their health. For medical professionals, this can be both good and bad. It’s a positive in that people feel more empowered than ever about their health, but access to all of that information can lead to self-diagnosis of their own ailments, which is potentially problematic. …


Here are eight signs gluten is keeping you from achieving your summer fitness goals

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Don’t let a gluten intolerance tip the scales for you as we close out the summer

For some, summer marks the season for showing off all the exercise and healthy choices they’ve committed to this year. On the other hand, for many others, the season can represent an ongoing struggle to reach their fitness goals. There are many variables involved in weight loss, muscle gain and overall physical health: lifestyle choices, age, hormones, genes, thyroid issues, and the list goes on. …


With More Than 12 Million Men Affected in the US Alone, It’s Time to Spotlight What They Need to Know

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Autoimmune disease comes in all shapes and forms

Autoimmune disease (AD), a condition in which one’s immune system mistakenly attacks the body’s own healthy cells, is currently reported to affect 50 million Americans today. So why is autoimmune disease virtually absent from the discussion during Men’s Health Month?

Autoimmune disease is disproportionately prevalent among women — which account for more than 75 percent of diagnosed cases. As a result, this disease has largely been written off as a women’s health issue. The problem with using that metric to exclude men from the conversation is that with 50 million affected in the US alone, that leaves more than 12 million men (25 percent) affected by some form of autoimmune disease. …


A Look at Where Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Fits Into the Conversation During Celiac Disease Awareness Month

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Celiac Disease Awareness Month is a great opportunity to shine a light on NCGS

May marks the Celiac Disease Foundation’s recognition of Celiac Disease Awareness Month and — while it is not necessarily an occasion for raucous celebration — this month offers an important opportunity to shine a light on this somewhat-complicated autoimmune disease and some of the mysteries that surround it for those who may be experiencing symptoms. One mystery, in particular, that is worthy of exploration and increased awareness during Celiac Disease Awareness Month is non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), a condition that affects six times as many people as celiac disease.

NCGS was originally labeled to describe the effects of individuals who cannot tolerate gluten and experience symptoms similar to those with celiac disease yet lack the same antibodies and intestinal damage. However, in 2016, research conducted at Columbia University Medical Center confirmed that wheat exposure in this group of individuals is triggering a systemic immune reaction and accompanying intestinal cell damage, similar to that of celiac disease. The caveat is that they are not yet sure if gluten is the culprit. For this reason, some researchers are now comfortably referring to this condition more as non-celiac wheat sensitivity (NCWS). …


More than 50 million American’s suffer from autoimmune conditions today and there are some things they’d really like you to understand

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From food, to fitness, to nights out on the town—everything is a bit more complicated with an autoimmune condition.

With over 100 autoimmune diseases identified and about 50 million Americans currently suffering from at least one of them according to the American Autoimmune Related Disease Association, it is likely that we all know at least one person leading a life complicated by an autoimmune condition. While autoimmune disease and all its variations can be complex to understand, there are many commonalities among them — and your friends and family who are currently living a life complicated by autoimmune issues would love for you to understand what they are dealing with. They want you to know so you have a sense of what they are facing, how they handle it, why they feel the way they do and how they approach their health. …


It’s the Season of Merriment—And Triggers for Health Issues Resulting from Leaky Gut

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Leaky gut can get the best of us during the holiday eating season

Genetics are usually the first to be blamed for our food intolerance, sensitivities, and disorders. While they are said to play a role in the digestive functions of individuals, there are many lifestyle triggers responsible for the onset of digestive issues. Stress and diet, food intolerance and excessive alcohol consumption, in particular, are key factors. Well, guess what! We just happen to be rolling into the greatest host of these lifestyle triggers: the holiday season!

Leaky gut syndrome, the process of bacterial antigens and unwanted proteins permeating the intestinal wall and leaking into the bloodstream, is a condition that has raised concern over recent years, and with good reason. Western lifestyle is thought to be a major contributor to leaky guts across America. While this victimizes our culture, it also illustrates that it can be fixed or avoided altogether. How? Through a thoughtful diet and healthy behaviors. Unfortunately, both of these often go MIA during the holidays as we indulge in less-than-healthy, rich foods and drinks while functioning on minimal sleep and maximum stress. …


Consider Your Immune System the Next Time You Reach for Your Favorite Household Cleaners

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Your go-to home cleaning products may be contributing to, or even causing, autoimmune related illness

Would you be surprised if we told you that the very products you might be using to rid your home of dirt, germs, grime and bacteria might actually be causing you and your family more harm than those elements would themselves? Would you be concerned if we suggested that your everyday household cleaning products could not only aggravate chronic health and immunity issues, but could even cause the onset of autoimmune related illness?

Well, the good news is that these risks can be mitigated if you know what to look for and there are tests available to gauge reaction to the potentially harmful toxins and chemicals we tend to invite into our homes. …

About

Dr. Chad Larson

Dr. Chad Larson, NMD, DC, CCN, CSCS, Advisor and Consultant on Clinical Consulting Team for Cyrex Laboratories

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