Here at Doctory, we couldn’t be more proud that our CEO and Founder, Maliha Khalid has been recognised for leading Doctory’s response to COVID19 by winning the SDGs and Her award for the South Asia region.

SDGs and Her is a competition, set up by the World Bank, UN Women, UNDP, and Wharton College’s Zicklin Center for Business Ethics, to showcase women-led businesses that support the UN’s SDGs. The awards ceremony was screened live on 30th September at 8 am EST. Didn’t get a chance to watch the SDG and her award event? Don’t worry! …


ISLAMABAD: Nasir Khan, a Rawalpindi resident, and father of five, spends nearly 10pc of his salary on doctors’ consultation fees for his children, all ages between two and nine.

“I earn little and have many mouths to feed, so it becomes painful to pay consultation fees for doctors. But I am an educated person so I prefer to take my children to a doctor rather than asking a person sitting at a medical store for medicine. …


Islamabad: In a country where half of the population does not have reliable access to healthcare, Doctory Health Centre-which offers free primary care services to all Pakistanis, regardless of where they live, what income they earn, or what gender they belong to-has come as a blessing. The Centre has undertaken to promote free access to healthcare across Pakistan. The service uses new age technology-telephone and internet-to extend reach and cross traditional barriers.

As Doctory’s CEO Maliha Khalid puts it, “Doctory believes in the timely and hassle-free provision of primary care as a fundamental right of every human being.” Explaining the…


The health-technology nexus in Pakistan

Home to nearly 200 million people, Pakistan brims with human potential while simultaneously teeming with poverty and despair. In the health sector, Pakistan has often been at the periphery when it comes to achieving its goals. One main reason is poor access to health facilities, especially in the case of rural areas. According to a recent survey conducted in 2018 by the Herald and Sustainable Development Policy Institute, 59% of respondents said that there is a lack of availability of health services at the union council and community levels. Moreover, according to the Global Access to Healthcare Index, Pakistan ranks…


MUCH is said these days about how unqualified ‘quacks’ are playing havoc with the lives of the undiscerning public in Pakistan. Doctors and their professional bodies, who miss no opportunity to highlight the presence of so-called quacks as a menace to society, drive much of this narrative. The following is another perspective, one that focuses on the interest of the patients rather than that of the physicians.

Healthcare practitioners working at the primary level who are typically labeled as ‘quacks’ generally belong to two main categories: 1) those who have served previously or are still working as paramedics in public…


IMRAN Khan won his mandate on the promise of eliminating corruption and promoting good governance in public office. His government’s first 100 days in power are being watched closely with the expectation of a jumpstart for his promised new Pakistan. In the medicine sector, Khan is faced with daunting challenges that need bold but careful decisions to ensure a turnaround.

Let’s first put things into perspective. Essential medicines and supplies are vital tools needed to improve and maintain health. However, for too many people in Pakistan, these medicines and supplies are unaffordable, unavailable, unsafe and improperly used. …


This is the second installment in a series of real-time articles about the early stages of developing a healthcare service for Pakistan. We’re conducting research across a variety of urban, peri-urban, rural, and feudal regions. I’m documenting my own research methods and processes for product development along the way.

Although healthcare is an industry that I know well, the context of Pakistan is new. To help close that gap of knowledge, I’m using a method I developed when going into markets that are foreign to me. I call it “market context interviews.” …


It’s no secret that Pakistan’s healthcare system is in need of change. The public system is overwhelmed, and the private system — existing exclusively in urban areas — is out of reach for the 70% of our population that lives outside the cities. The contributions of NGOs run by donor money have been essential for us, but relying on foreign aid is not a sustainable solution. It also comes with unrealistic expectations and lack of sustenance once the funding dries up. We deserve our own system, under the control of the people it serves. …


It seems difficult to imagine a world where the population is reduced by over 99.9% by a single superbug so virulent and infectious that it kills most humans in less than a year. None of the available antibiotics would work, as the superbug is resistant to them. The scenario is presented in a radio play Resistance by the thriller writer Val McDermid, broadcast in three parts on BBC Radio 4 on March 3, 10, and 17 of this year. This scenario is not limited to thrillers. …


This is the first installment of a series of real-time articles of the early stages of developing a healthcare service for Pakistan. We’ll be conducting research across a variety of cities, rural areas, and feudal regions. I’ll document my own research methods and processes for product development along the way.

Doctory

Digitizing healthcare for emerging markets

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store