ZYNGA TO RECEIVE THE 2018 DOG AWARD

Dogs at Work
Aug 2, 2018 · 3 min read

Dogs@work named Zynga as a 2018 recipient of The DOG Award. “Zynga has beautifully established the dog as a valuable addition to its corporate culture,” says Debbie Black, Director of Dogs@work. “Since its inception, Zynga has been at the forefront of integrating their furry friends into their human culture.”

Zynga is the online gaming company based in San Francisco responsible for Farmville, Words with Friends, and Texas HoldEm. Its name and logo derive from co-founder, Marc Pincus’s American Bulldog, Zinga. The gaming company joins Mars, Incorporated, Build-A-Bear Workshop, Bissell Homecare, Google and Zogics in the inaugural circle of companies who are DOG award winners.

The American Bulldog, Zinga, is immortalized in the company’s name and logo here at San Francisco headquarters

Dogs@work is an animal advocacy group that encourages positive awareness of dogs in corporate culture. Research shows that 1 in 10 companies support dogs in the workplace. 37% of dog owners would sacrifice vacation time or a pay raise to be able to bring their dog to work. 44% of dog lovers would consider a career move for a pet-friendly workplace.

At Zynga, pet insurance for dogs is offered along with healthcare coverage for humans. The creators of popular games such as Farmville has declared that “every day is ‘bring your dog to work day.” When Zynga employees take their dogs to work, there are free treats for the dogs on hand. There’s even a small play area on the roof of the Zynga building in San Francisco for the dogs. And it’s not only dogs — Zynga welcomes cats, ferrets, and lizards too.

“The DOG Award is about more than recognizing successful organizations,” says Black. “The communities which earn The DOG Award exemplify companies that invest in every level of its employee’s performance. Zynga is at the forefront of the dogs at work movement.”

Zinga with Zynga co-founder, Marc Pincus | photo by JD Lasica

“A surprising number and variety of businesses now recognize the added value of allowing dogs in the workplace, and not just on the annual Take Your Dog to Work day,” says Julia Lane of Bark Magazine. “Increasingly, what started out as occasional canine visits have grown into standard practice in offices around the country.

“Likewise, official pet policies are now part of many employee handbooks; the rules not only address proper pooch-related etiquette and behavior, they also provide non-dog people with assurance that their needs are taken into consideration. But a document weighed down in legalese doesn’t explain the amazing transformation that can happen to a company and its people when dogs are welcomed. People who perhaps would never have met or spoken to one another are drawn to the dog in the cubicle or out in the parking lot. A shy person feels free to greet the dog and kneel down beside her for a friendly lick. A fearful person bravely reaches out a hand for the dog to smell, and delights in her cold nose.”

The Latin phrase, A bonis ad meliora, embedded in the gold circle of The DOG Award means from good to better. “Zynga has made its good company better by including their employees’ dogs in its culture,” says David Paul Kirkpatrick, a director at Dogs@work, and the former President of Paramount Pictures and the former President of Walt Disney Pictures. “With better companies, we have a better world.”

This November, the DOG Award will be presented to Zynga at the company headquarters in San Francisco. “It’s exciting for us to be presenting this award to Zynga with both dogs and their humans in attendance,” says Black.

To join Dogs@work Nation, please find us at dogs@work.com

Dogs at Work
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