Head of Analytics at Cyient, an engineering design, networks and operations company, Bhoopathi Rapolu shares six guiding principles for the design of connected medical devices

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According to IT research company Gartner, there will be more than 20 billion connected devices globally by 2020, with the Internet of Things (IoT) increasingly impacting on every aspect of both our professional and personal lives. Take healthcare for instance, the proliferation of connectivity among both medical and personal-health/fitness tracking devices is leading to an explosion in the amount of data generated. This, in turn, is opening up new possibilities for device manufacturers to embed artificial intelligence (AI) into their equipment. These devices collect terabytes of data every day — monitoring, for example, our heart rate, blood pressure, the number of steps we take and calories we burn — most of which goes unused. …


Is the most health useful data simply slipping through our fingers? Maxine Macintosh argues that it’s our ‘wellness data’ which includes everything from our lifestyle to our social networks — that holds the key to effective healthcare in the future, not just our medical records

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The seeming nonchalance with which our day-to-day personal data is used continually surprises me, especially when contrasted with public attitude towards the use of healthcare data. This lack of concern represents a melting pot of ambivalence, convenience and ignorance.

Take for example, Pokémon Go, which hit the headlines earlier this summer not least because the app seemingly required ‘full access’ to individuals’ Google accounts. Though this was later revealed as ‘bad’ wording, the request had evidently not deterred millions of Pokémonites. Access to personal information and mobile sensors was perceived to be an appropriate payoff for using this amazing game. A less transient example is Google; as I mentioned at a recent event on the role of data in digital health innovation, our data is the currency by which we buy the services of convenience from Google. This was in response to the question of whether the donation of our health data should be a criterion upon which the NHS is free at point of care. Personal data as a currency for convenience, use and access is now a familiar scenario, so why has this not yet pervaded healthcare? …


In the wake of telecomms giant Nokia’s downfall, and riding on the coat-tails of the country’s pioneering gaming industry, Finland has given rise to a slew of innovative young medtech companies that are taking full advantage of Finnish design talent and the nation’s digital, UX and custom-manufacturing expertise

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iStock.com/Joel Carillet

In 1982, Finnish company Polar Electro launched the world’s first wire-free heart monitor, the Sport Tester PE2000, changing the way athletes train by making data available to consumers and scientists alike. …


As anyone who has fallen foul of their sat nav will know, it’s not always easy to get where you want to go if you don’t know where you’re going in the first place. Having a clear set of directions that will put you on the path to growth, and make your investors feel confident that you know how to get there, is the theory behind writing a business plan.

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Just like a job interview, when you write a business plan, it’s a chance to showcase all the knowledge, skills and self-awareness that you have to make your startup happen. And, just like a job interview, there’ll be killer questions that you’ll need to answer. …


Sue Montgomery looks at how efforts to share research data have been progressing and finds out what needs to happen next, as well as canvassing experts for their perspectives on the future of Open Science

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The call for Open Science is accompanied by a promise to spur innovation beyond what’s possible in the siloes of science and technology today. However, this urgency to open up the innovation landscape in the name of progress is nothing new. In 2011, physicist-turned-writer Michael Nielsen provided a highly popular presentation at TEDxWaterloo, titled, ‘Open Science Now!’ The description dates the talk to the available technology at the time: ‘What if every scientist could share their data as easily as they tweet about their lunch? …


As medical technology becomes increasingly digitised, simple procedures such as health check-ups can often get overlooked. Not for long though, as these will soon get a makeover with new online platform, Omixy, founded by Paris-based GP and business superwoman Dr Lavinia Ionita. Set to launch this year, Omixy introduces genomics to patient testing, providing a more holistic approach to personalised medicine

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iStock.com/betyarlaca

Traditional medicine, as we know it, is based on ‘standards of care’, a generalisation of the best courses of prevention or treatment for the average patient. You go to your GP complaining of fatigue. …


Breaking into the fortress that is the NHS with your medtech innovation can sometimes seem a bit of losing battle. But it needn’t be so. Seasoned commercialisation strategist Keith Morris explains how SMEs learn deal with the NHS procurement process

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As the NHS strives to transform to meet the increased and changing demands for its services, commissioners and healthcare providers still have to deliver safe, efficacious and cost-effective services at local level. …


After winning Simon Cowell’s F Factor inaugural entrepreneurship prize of £10,000 earlier this year, GyroGear startup is now adding the finishing touches to its very first device, the GyroGlove. Founded by Faii Ong, this is an intelligent wearable device aimed at stabilising hand tremor in patients with Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor.

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iStock.com/francisblack

Up to 20 million people worldwide are estimated to be living with Parkinson’s disease — and 200 million with essential tremor. Most people who get Parkinson’s are aged over 50 but some are affected at a much younger age and are then exposed to a lifetime of being heavily dependent on medication. The drugs, in turn, can cause major side effects in the form of impulsive/compulsive behaviour, hallucinations and delusions. …

Doris Retfalvi

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