Make a List, But Don’t Check it Twice

By: Abram Fleming

When you are searching for a career, whether it be a new job or your very first, so many people offer ways to help and offer ideas for the hunt. One thought that I heard most often was to make a list of the things you want and don’t want in the job. Some popular ideas on lists like these are; day-to-day tasks, culture of the company, coworkers, or amount of travel. Everyone’s lists are different and will rank those items in different orders, depending on what is most important to them personally. And each of those items truly are important, because we spend a lot of our time at work.

When I graduated from college, I made that list of my own; the things that were important to me in the job I would first have. It was more of wishful thinking though, as I didn’t want to be too picky and completely rule myself out for jobs I really didn’t know enough about. But that wish list was in the back of my mind as I searched and searched to find the “perfect first job.” I kept it in the back of my mind as I would apply and interview. I would try to always be on top of my senses meeting people and hearing them talk about the positions. And that list in my mind did give me a sense that none of the jobs were good enough for me. I didn’t see the true value in them. I realized that it was holding me back. I was trying to hold every job and everyone there to some high standard, that when I thought about it, didn’t make sense. It made me more uptight and not as open to seeing people for who they truly are, and that should matter the most.

When I finally realized this, it helped me to be myself. Just shortly after I made this change, I got a job offer I was ecstatic about. And I was ecstatic because I, for once felt that I was the one not good enough for the position. I received a job at DoubleMap as a Sales Development Representative. Now a SDR position is not really anyone’s dream job, but it is a place to start. And that is just what I needed, a place to start my first career out of school. Afterall, it isn’t about the position.

After being at DoubleMap for sometime, I looked back at my “job wish list.” I saw that it fulfilled so many of the most important items I had on there. I believe that is one of the main reasons why I have enjoyed working over a year now with DoubleMap. The people who I am able to work with and the culture of the company. I was able to accept a job which at the time, I couldn’t tell met those items on my list. I now know that is because most of the items that we put on the list aren’t things you are able to see in a first, second, or even third visit. Sure, some things will be very clear to see, but most take time to evolve.

If I had stuck to my list, I don’t know when I would have found a job. So go ahead, make the list. I really do recommend it. Just don’t let that list be the focal point for what you are looking for. Instead, go out there with an open and clear mind and see what unfolds in front of you. And I hope that you will find your DoubleMap.