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Photo by Harrison Broadbent on Unsplash

Up until this year I’ve always avoided the itch to buy a Raspberry Pi or any of the other single board tinkerer/hobbyist computers on the market that are popular among nerds like myself. From what I saw, they were always more focused on tinkering with electronics and robotics and less of a usable PC replacement. In high school and college, I did a lot of tinkering with hardware and electronics, and since then my interests have shifted more towards software, so revisiting the world of hardware wasn’t really something I was looking to do.

But this year as Covid-related boredom set in over the summer, and I spent many hours mindlessly watching YouTube videos, I learned that the latest generation of the popular single board computer, the Raspberry Pi 4 model B, was much more powerful than previous models. I came across some interesting projects built with Raspberry Pi computers with web development and infrastructure technologies that interest me, so I decided now was the time to re-ignite my teenage passion for setting up networks and servers, albeit in a much smaller and more energy efficient form factor than I had in the late 90s and early 2000s. It’s been years since I’ve done any projects with “bare metal” as most of my infrastructure has been in the cloud. …


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I spent nearly 10 years working for a non-profit organization, and along the way, I saw many situations where a specific need existed, a job description was written, and one person was hired to handle that need — in isolation. The newly hired talent may have been exceptional. They were lauded to be the silver bullet we needed with their unique skills, experience, and personality. But the results were usually far from what we were told to expect.

As I looked at these repeated failures, I started to recognize some similarities. The only meaningful input these new staff received was from their direct manager. There was duplication between what one of these staff members was doing and what their counterparts in other departments were doing. They lacked support from someone with deeper institutional or domain knowledge. …


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Photo by Abdallah Maqboul from Pexels

Culture is such a buzzword in business these days. We talk about it to our customers. We look for employees that fit it. And we look for jobs where the culture matches our own preferences and values. Companies of all sizes want to grow it, shape it, and foster it. But what exactly is it?

First off, you already have a company culture. It may be good, or it may be bad. You may love it, or you may hate it. But it definitely already exists.

In 2009, I attended South by Southwest Interactive, and I had the privilege of listening to Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh’s keynote about company culture. At the time his views were fairly radical, and Zappos culture and its supporting hiring and onboarding practices were new and different. …


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Photo by Safar Safarov on Unsplash

As a member of the Medium Partner Program, I publish almost all of my content on Medium. But recently there’s been a lot of talk in my Twitter network about the Medium paywall and a lot of writers moving away from Medium because of it. Personally I still very much like Medium and don’t mind the paywall, so I plan to continue publishing here for the foreseeable future.

But I was struck with a little sense of fear about what would happen to my content if Medium were to go away, or simply change their model to one that I do not want to participate in. …


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Photo by Kobu Agency on Unsplash

Tech leadership is a mystery to many. As one racks up years of experience as a developer, there’s often an assumption that one must eventually move into tech leadership to continue to grow. And while this may be true, given the structure and hierarchy of the company you work for, the jump from individual contributor to tech leader isn’t always smooth. The two roles have some crossover in skills, but each also requires its own unique set of skills to get the job done as well.

I’ve been a tech lead of sorts for a lot of my career, from my time managing a development team to my side freelance projects, which often involve managing subcontractors. But it’s only in the last two years that I’ve been at Happy Cog, where I’ve been a tech lead in a more official capacity. With that shift came a lot of trial by fire, and I’ve definitely learned a lot along the way. …


In late 2017, when I found out my job was soon to discriminate against me (and others), I had the connections and unique blend of skills to land a new gig within just a few weeks. Since I left in early 2018, I’ve put a lot of energy into sharing my story and shining light into the very dark side of American Bible Society, the organization I worked for.

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On October 28, 2019, my former employer, American Bible Society, announced that their president, Roy Peterson, was retiring— effective immediately. Hearing this news and knowing that he had only been there for four years, and that he is only in his mid-60s, and that people don’t just retire on a whim, I cannot help but believe that Peterson was not so much “retiring” as he was “fired.” …


This sounds like the dream scenario for the stereotypical megalomaniac manager. But I assure you that I’m not one of those.

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Image by StockSnap from Pixabay

I led a web marketing team inside a nonprofit organization for several years. While the environment throughout the organization was often toxic, I tried to maintain a consistent positive morale among the team I managed. (“God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change”, as the old saying goes.)

Every day we would meet in the corner by the windows of our office to have our daily standup meeting. The eight of us on my team, plus our project manager, would start off with a little small talk and then jump in to business. Each team member shared what they had going on that day. I would interject with questions, guidance, and prioritization directions, based on the current demands coming from leadership and the rest of the organization. …


There are few situations in life as devastating as a show-hole. I know you know the feeling I’m talking about. We’ve all been there.

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Image by Engin_Akyurt from Pixabay

The stages of show-hole grief

You’ve been binging a show that totally gets you. It’s your vibe, your jam, your everything. Sometimes you’ve been watching the show for years, other times you may have only discovered it last weekend (when you had another stark realization about the fragility of your social life). …


I’ve been writing and publishing content on the web for years, but I’ve never been consistent at it. I’ve always worked at it for a while, but then my momentum fizzles out and I give up again. While I’ve enjoyed having some sort of an audience during each of my attempts, it was never enough to keep me going.

But this time something’s different.

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Image by StartupStockPhotos from Pixabay

Back story

A quiet, self-identified introvert, I’ve never been great with words when speaking out loud. I need to process and assemble my thoughts, and that simply can’t happen when I’m speaking off the cuff. …


I’ve been a manager of some sort for nearly 7 years. And it’s hard — but not for the reasons you think.

I think there’s a lot of misconceptions about what management really is.

Non-managers often have the preconception that being a manager position is like a more demanding version of their own role. That is, they often expect that a manager is similar to them in skillset, just with deeper or broader experience within the same field.

Those who are hiring (or promoting people to be) managers also tend to share the preconceived notion that in order to effectively manage a team, you must first have reached the ultimate level of experience within that domain. …

About

Jeremy Gimbel

I write about a web development, leadership, management, humor, and LGBTQ+ issues. Find me at https://dreadfullyposh.com.

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