Erik Bryn presents A Sneak Peek at Ember 2.0

The SF JavaScript meetup was very lucky to host Ember core team member Erik Bryn (@ebryn) on June 9, 2015. Below, a video of the event. Behold:

It took Ember two years to get from the conception of Ember to the 1.0 version. Since then, we’ve gone through many versions and we’re not working on an exciting version, 1.13, which includes a new rendering engine, Glimmer, based off some interesting work on React.

Ember’s release cycle is based off the Chrome release cycle, with Canary, Beta and Release versions, every six weeks.

The first beta of Ember 2.0 drops on June 12 [see the announcement.] Ember 1.0 was a completely different world than we live in today. You had to do a lot of work up front, including the build system, to make your app shippable.

The world of Ember 2.0 is different. We’ve decided “I will never grunt watch again.” We’re building a framework for creating abmitious web applications, and we wanted to free ourselves from the build-your-own-build-tool syndrome. Ember-cli allows you to spend time building your app.

Ember’s foundational technologies are now node.js, npm, broccoli.js and babel. By having a set foundation that we hope the community adopts, this enables a new add-on ecosystem. When you want to use third-party code in your app, it should be one line of code, with auto-configured convention. You can check these out at http://www.emberaddons.com/. Add-on code will be scored at http://emberobserver.com/.

Ember 2.0 is a semver release that also allows us to deprecate all the code that has been accumulating since Ember 1.0. This allows us to shed a lot of less useful code. We’re also dropping support for IE 6, 7 and 8. That allows us to drop another batch of code. Due to this, we’re assuming that you can use ES5 features. A lot of the gross-ness of ember has to do with the backwards-compatibility which we are removing.

Thanks to Erik and our sponsors PubNub, Sinch, JasperSoft and Autodesk.

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