A Productive Git Workflow

Since git is an integral part of my development life cycle and I spend quite sometime committing things to it, I always felt there was something missing, until I did my Android Nanodegree at Udacity where I learned about structured commits.


Why structure your commits?

  1. Keeps your git history neat & meaningful.
  2. Easy to generate change logs

Lets look at how I structure my commits.

The Commit Prefixes

  • feat — a new feature
  • fix — a bug fix
  • docs — changes to documentation
  • style — formatting, missing semi colons, etc; no logical code change
  • refactor — refactoring production code
  • test — adding tests, refactoring test; no production code change
  • chore — updating build tasks etc; no production code change

But you’ll be wondering how is it productive when you have to type those tags into each commit message.

So here’s a script you might want to see

Just put it into your PATH and access it easily like so

$ commit feat

So now when I do

git log --oneline --decorate --graph

Here is what it yields

This is just half the fun

Now when I want to generate a change log, I have a python script that picks up all the commits with the tags feat or fix to generate a change log for me.

Here is the python script

So the output of the python script looks something like this in a change-log.json file

{  
"features":[
"feature 1",
"feature 2",
"feature 3"
],
"fixes":[
"fix 1",
"fix2",
"fix 3"
],
"major":0,
"minor":9,
"patch":11
}

You can then use this to easily curate your CHANEGLOG.md or tell your boss what you did over the last X days.

You can change this variable in the python script on line number 14 to generate the change log from the date you want

afterDate = '2016-09-12'

I’ll be adding more productivity related stuff to it soon. Till then you can give some love to the repo.

https://github.com/droidchef/productivity/