What is Channeling?

“Ascended masters will return to earth and usher in a new golden age.”

“Who told you that?”

“Malchizadek.”

You know, the King of Salem. Archangel Michael.

Or an alien. Depending on your perspective.

Think it’s BS? Some people do. Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD), Schizophrenia, and Overactive Imagination are terms sprinkled by skeptics to those who channel. Even “Someone who wants to seem special and important,” a more politically correct phrase, is still demeaning of those who are qualified.

To channel successfully means To allow another consciousness to speak through you.

If that idea makes you cringe, but you’re curious about a rational, scientific, western perspective — I offer you an opportunity to suspend disbelief, and replace the word “Channeling” with “Inspired Intuitive Speaking.”

In Unity Consciousness (UC) or nondual perspective, it’s allowing another aspect of you — with a name, source, origin, and personality — to speak through you.

A legit channel can access Superconsciousness, the Akashic Records, and other realms of higher information, relaying facts that the channeler previously hadn’t been exposed to.

A fraudulent channel lies about this, makes up a voice, and says things in an intense way. That’s Spiritual Entertainment.

A Developing Channel — most all Channels currently active — is someone with an ego, protectors, desires and attachments that can distort and filter the message.

A Legit Channel’s transmission is 100% accurate.

A fraudulent channel’s transmission is 0% accurate, with any accuracies occurring by luck, or with priorly obtained knowledge.

A Developing Channel’s (DC) transmission is 1–99% accurate. Usually, by the time a DC goes public with their information, their accuracy is above 30%. If you know them to be a considerate, mindful, humble person, it’s likely above 60%.

Paul Selig, who wrote the Book of Knowing and Worth, is an accomplished psychic and channel. I’ve personally had 1:1 sessions with him and attended one of his workshops in January of 2016, and can verify that he’s a very high level channel. I can’t say without well designed tests what his accuracy is, but intuitively, I’d place it at 85–95%.

NB: This rating scale is arbitrary and by no means authoritative; I reserve 95% — 100% for people who have undergone extensive testing to verify facts. David Wilcox, in an episode of his Cosmic Disclosure series, shared:

“…one of the earliest verified channelings from the 1950s. This guy W. B. Smith gave people a list of 200 questions, and everybody who answered in the same way, he was able to verify, because it was based on classified intel.”

I invented this Channeling Verification System because I haven’t seen one before, and the western material world desperately needs analytical perspectives on spiritual matters. Many people — including engineers and rationalists, which surround me out here in Silicon Valley — need data to accurately assess a phenomenon.

Data is also valuable because it helps us understand why some topics have remained mysterious — especially those that at first glance seem highly implausible if not impossible.

Acupuncture used to be considered quirky. Now, it’s covered by medicare and has several regulatory organizations like National Certification Commissions. This dramatically reduces the number of unqualified acupuncturists, while helping a less-than-educated public find people who know their stuff.

We need the same with channeling. While there are many epic and popular channels like the Law of One series and the organization Abraham-Hicks, most channeled material is often too esoteric for mainstream audiences, who get watered-down versions like the exciting yet superficial The Secret, which was based on Abraham’s material.

John Klimo, a professor at Rosebridge Graduate School, wrote a textbook on channeling and has an excellent short video explaining the concept. The animated YouTube series Spirit Science also published a terrific video on it.

People channel for many reasons. As a channel myself, I’d compare the ability to painting in that:

  1. Anyone can learn to paint, but some people are naturally better at it
  2. If you love to paint, you’ll want to paint often
  3. Many painting skills and techniques are well documented, so painters can improve their craft
  4. Excellent painters can build careers and make lots of money
  5. Most painters make very little money, until they apply quality, consistent professional skill at the professional side of the ability
  6. Not everyone will like my {or any random painter’s} artwork.
  7. Some people will love my artwork.
  8. Some people will pay money for my artwork.
  9. Some people will criticize my artwork, or hate it. They aren’t my audience.
  10. The more you paint, the better you get at it.

Anyone can learn to channel. Not every channel has material you’ll care about. Some people may pick up and put down the practice (and development of abilities, which often start subtly and like many things, grow with time and practice). Others may devote their lives to it, investing significant time every week, over years getting very good, and very well known — enough to support a growing business and lifestyle.

Whether you believe a legit channel as honestly saying “A higher being is speaking through me” or them simply accessing their higher self doesn’t matter in my opinion, so long as the information serves you as useful.

People often synonymize the word “Channeling” with “Receiving information” or “Receiving a Transmission.” In this artwork, Alex Grey illustrates how a painter “Channels a Painting:”

Elizabeth Gilbert, in her fabulous TED talk Your Elusive Creative Genius, described a more sanitized version of Channeling as “Receiving inspiration from your Muse.”

If you don’t like the idea of contacting disembodied entities (i.e. souls without a physical body, who speak through yours), remote viewing may be more up your alley.

The Journal of Scientific Exploration analyzed using information obtained by remote viewing Stock Market Prediction. This finding was first published in a Wall Street Journal front page story.

The Farsight Institute, an authority on Remote Viewing, defines “Remote viewing is a controlled and trainable mental process involving psi (or psychic ability). It is used to transfer perceptual information across time and space. It is clear that remote viewing works in complete violation of the accepted “laws” of quantum and relativistic physics. So those “laws” are incomplete.”

So, next time you’re prepping for the end of this semester’s School of Life, you just might want to consider another test prep strategy — one that involves getting information from beyond the book.