Your Technology Stack for an Accessible Virtual Conference

Large empty conference room
Photo by chuttersnap on Unsplash

1. Website

Conference website example screenshots — IEEE VR 2020 and Accessibility Camp

2. Video Conferencing

Video Conferencing logos — Zoom, Google Meet, Cisco Webex, Skype, Microsoft Teams
A laptop on a desk features a videoconference of 4 people
Videoconferencing software is a reliable, focused way to present content. (Image source: Google Meet)

3. Video Broadcasting

Video Broadcasting — Youtube and Twitch icons
A screenshot of a YouTube video
A screenshot of a YouTube video
Broadcasting over YouTube or Twitch ensures mass access to your content and guaranteed Video on Demand with captions afterwards.

4. Captioning

Captioning — Amara and Streamtext icons
Left — a page of text generated by Streamtext, with options for type size, color, etc. Right — text embedded in Mozilla Hubs
Tools like StreamText can offer users both customizable text streams (left) as well as embedded captions for environments like Mozilla Hubs (right)

5. Audience Engagement

Audience Engagement — Slido, Aha Slides, Poll Everywhere logos
Screenshot of Slido software on desktop and phone, showing a poll anyone can join via a conference hashtag
Screenshot of Slido software on desktop and phone, showing a poll anyone can join via a conference hashtag
Tools like Slido allow your audience to engage with your speakers no matter where either are. Image via Slido

6. Messaging

Messaging logos — Discord, Slack
Screenshot of IEEE VR 2020 Slack showing users chatting, reacting to messages, and forming a message thread
Messaging tools like Slack can provide fast, asynchronous communication between organizers and attendees.

7. Virtual Reality

Virtual Reality logos — Mozilla Hubs, Altspace VR, Engage

Don’t hold conferences that are 100% VR.

A group of avatars take a selfie in a Mozilla Hubs virtual reality environment
A group of avatars take a selfie in a Mozilla Hubs virtual reality environment
VR is amazing for encouraging organic social exchange in small or medium groups, including the ubiquitous taking of selfies. (Image: IEEE VR 2020 group in Mozilla Hubs)
Screenshot of Mozilla Hubs with an overwhelming amount of overlapping content — users names, volume adjustment, emojis, etc.
Screenshot of Mozilla Hubs with an overwhelming amount of overlapping content — users names, volume adjustment, emojis, etc.
VR still struggles with accessibility and user interface issues, and crowded interfaces like this can pose a challenge to users with disabilities or technological difficulties. (Image taken in Mozilla Hubs)

UX Designer and Virtual Reality specialist. I believe good design empowers its users. Master’s student at Berkeley’s School of Information. www.drfoxdesign.com

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