Top 25 Movies of the Last 25 years as voted by IMDB members.

IMDB (The online movie database) is almost 25 years old, and in honour of that milestone they have compiled a list of the best 25 films of the last 25 years as voted by their members. The list starts at 1990 and runs up until 2014, with the average user rating generating the score respectively. All genres are covered from action flicks to heart warming tales.

Lets begin.

1. Interstellar 8.7

A team of explorers travel through a wormhole in space in an attempt to ensure humanity’s survival.

Christopher Nolan is hot news at the moment and has 5 films in the top 25. Interstellar is his most ambitious project to date. He manages to create pure cinematic majesty every time he directs and interstellar is no different.

2. The Wolf of Wall Street 8.2

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Based on the true story of Jordan Belfort, from his rise to a wealthy stock-broker living the high life to his fall involving crime, corruption and the federal government. The wolf of Wall Street divided opinion when it was released. Viewers found Belfort (the main character) loathsome and despicable, where as others hailed him for his sheer tenacity and cheek. But there is no doubting the brilliance of Martin Scorcese film but you may need a cold shower after watching.

3. Django Unchained

8.5

With the help of a German bounty hunter, a freed slave sets out to rescue his wife from a brutal Mississippi plantation owner.

The latest instalment in Quentin Tarantino’s voyage through the 20th century period genre borrows the name of its hero from a series of Italian spaghetti westerns and takes inspiration from those films for its revengeful based story

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4. Intouchables 8.6

After he becomes a quadriplegic from a paragliding accident, an aristocrat hires a young man from the projects to be his caregiver. Films that are about disabilities and broken individual are far too often films that cross the line into “disease TV movie of the week” territory. The Intouchables which is a french film, avoids this pitfall by virtue of its great performances from Francois Cluzet as a rich paraplegic and Omar Sy as his carer who refuses to pity him and manages to be moving without resorting to cheap sentimentality. A big hit in Europe but not so much in the U.S

5. Inception 8.8

A thief who steals corporate secrets through use of dream-sharing technology is given the inverse task of planting an idea into the mind of a CEO.

Thanks to the massive commercial success of The Dark Knight Christopher Nolan had enough clout and resources to get Inception made. We can all be grateful for that, as he gave us the most original and dazzling science-fiction of the decade and possibly the century so far. A heady mix of sci-fi action, mind-bending visuals, and metaphysical discussions on the relationship between reality and perception, Inception is a groundbreaking movie.

6. Inglorious Basterds 8.3

In Nazi-occupied France during World War II, a plan to assassinate Nazi leaders by a group of Jewish U.S. soldiers coincides with a theatre owner’s vengeful plans for the same. Taking inspiration from the title (and nothing else) of a WWII-era, Italian B movie, Inglorious Basterds showed that Tarantino still had many tricks up his sleeve: He introduced talents who were at that point undiscovered by American audiences (in this case Christoph Waltz and Melanie Laurent), he could write long but never boring setpieces that relied on nothing but dialogue to create tension (that farmhouse opening scene!), and he could pull off the feat of (spoiler alert!) rewriting the course of history without affecting the audience’s suspension of disbelief.

7. Dark Knight 9.0

When the menace known as the Joker wreaks havoc and chaos on the people of Gotham, the caped crusader must come to terms with one of the greatest psychological tests of his ability to fight injustice. Expectations for The Dark Knight were very high, but no one could have predicted that the film would become such a monster hit, becoming the first film to pass $500 million in domestic box office. The Dark Knight proved that movies starring a guy in a cape and spandex pants could deliver more than lightweight escapism and gave us one of movie history’s most memorable villain. Heath Ledger’s Joker, an unforgettable performance that sadly had to be recognised posthumously by the Academy.

8. Into The Wild 8.2

After graduating from Emory University, top student and athlete Christopher McCandless abandons his possessions, gives his entire $24,000 savings account to charity and hitchhikes to Alaska to live in the wilderness. Along the way, Christopher encounters a series of characters that shape his life. Proving once again that life is all about the journey and not the destination, Into the Wild manages to be touching and exhilarating even to audiences who are aware that (spoiler alert!) things are not going to end well for the protagonist. Based on a true story popularised by Jon Krakauer’s non-fiction book, Into The Wild follows the adventure and travels of a free-spirited young man named Alexander McCandless.

9. The Departed 8.5

An undercover cop and a mole in the police attempt to identify each other while infiltrating an Irish gang in South Boston. Maybe the most amazing feat of The Departed is that it fits perfectly within Martin Scorsese’s oeuvre despite being a remake of a foreign language film, internal affairs. Part of the plaudits must go to William Mohahan’s screenplay, which transports the action from Hong Kong to Boston, and to a stellar cast, led by Jack Nicholson’s performance as a Whitey Bulger-inspired gangster. But it is Scorsese’s sure-handed direction that seals the deal and finally earned him a long-overdue Best Director.

10. Batman Begins 8.3

After training with his mentor, Batman begins his war on crime to free the crime-ridden Gotham City from corruption that the Scarecrow and the League of Shadows have cast upon it. It’s easy to take for granted the commercial and artistic success of Batman Begins. But when it was first announced, Christopher Nolan and Christian Bale were hardly household names, and the successful reboot of a franchise that seemed dead and buried after the campy catastrophe of Batman and Robin was far from guaranteed.

11. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind 8.4

When their relationship turns sour, a couple undergoes a procedure to have each other erased from their memories. But it is only through the process of loss that they discover what they had to begin with. It’s a shame that Jim Carrey has never received the respect he deserves as a dramatic actor. It’s certainly not for lack of trying, as films like man on the moon and especially Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind clearly attest. But if critics and award organizations have been reluctant to recognize him, the same can’t be said of IMDb users, who rated this film as the best of 2004 largely on the strength of his performance and Charlie Kaufman’s exceptional and Oscar-winning screenplay.

12.Lord of the Rings: The Return of the Kind 8.9

Gandalf and Aragorn lead the World of Men against Sauron’s army to draw his gaze from Frodo and Sam as they approach Mount Doom with the One Ring. The conclusion of Peter Jackson’s epic Tolkien trilogy did not disappoint audiences, who rewarded it with 11 Academy Awards (to tie the record set by Ben Hur and Titanic) and with a worldwide box office gross of more than $1.1 billion. Although a bit overlong, especially due to a series of multiple endings, the film represents the pinnacle of the trilogy and Peter Jackson’s career.

13. Lord of the Rings:

The Two Towers 8.7

While Frodo and Sam edge closer to Mordor with the help of the shifty Gollum, the divided fellowship makes a stand against Sauron’s new ally, Saruman, and his hordes of Isengard. Not including The Empire Strikes Back, T

he middle installment of a movie trilogy is often a transitional film that doesn’t eclipse its predecessor and sets the tone for the final episode. The Two Towers is no exception to this rule, largely continuing the path set by The Fellowship of the Ring and offering a number of visual setpieces, including the epic battle of Helm’s Deep.

14. Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. 8.8

A meek hobbit of the Shire and eight companions set out on a journey to Mount Doom to destroy the One Ring and the dark lord Sauron. It was a monumental and risky endeavor: a three-movie adaptation of one of the most beloved and epic fantasy novels of the 20th century. At the helm was a director from New Zealand, whose five previous films up to that point included at least three low-budget and very violent horror films: (Bad taste, Dead Alive, Meet the Fables). The gamble paid off in spades, with the trilogy earning a total U.S. box office of over more than $1 billion and 30 Academy Award nominations.

15. Memento 8.5

A man creates a strange system to help him remember things; so he can hunt for the murderer of his wife without his short-term memory loss being an obstacle. Sometimes IMDb audiences’ tastes align with the mainstream; sometimes they manage to blaze the trail and point others to undiscovered gems. Memento is an example of the latter: Ever since its debut at European festivals, it gathered enthusiastic reviews by our users and sparked positive word of mouth, which kept gathering momentum as the film debuted in the U.S. at Sundance. Months later, IMDb users could not stop talking about the film’s serpentine plot and timeline, and catapulted it to the top of our highest-rated films of the year.

16. Fight Club

8.9

An insomniac office worker, looking for a way to change his life, crosses paths with a devil-may-care soap maker, forming an underground fight club that evolves into something much, much more The rare movie adaptation that improves on its source material, by novelist Chuck Palaniuk’s own admission, Fight Club is another example of movie that initially struggled to find an audience but became a major cultural influence in the following years.

17. Saving Private Ryan. 8.6

Following the Normandy Landings, a group of U.S. soldiers go behind enemy lines to retrieve a paratrooper whose brothers have been killed in action. The Best Picture Oscar race of 1998 ended in an upset, with Shakespeare In love beating Saving Private Ryan for Best Picture. Shakespeare in Love remains a pleasant but harmless and mostly forgettable comedy. But Saving Private Ryan, with its especially grueling opening sequence, has lost none of its power, setting a visual and narrative standard that still looms large over war-action films.

18. Life is Beautiful 8.6

When an open-minded Jewish librarian and his son become victims of the Holocaust, he uses a perfect mixture of will, humor and imagination to protect his son from the dangers around their camp. It would prove to be a flash in the pan, but for a brief moment Italian actor, writer and director Roberto Benigni captured the attention of movie audiences all over the world with this simple comedy about a “clown” trying to protect his son from dealing with the reality of being emprisoned in a Nazi camp. Benigni’s popularity with audiences outside his native Italy didn’t last, but the legacy of his film lives on.

19. Fargo

8.2

Jerry Lundegaard’s inept crime falls apart due to his and his henchmen’s bungling and the persistent police work of the quite pregnant Marge Gunderson. The Coen Brothers had already made several great movies by the time Fargo was released, but this is the one that really catapulted them into the big leagues. Despite a dark plot full of murder and mayhem, it’s ultimately an optimistic and, in parts, very funny film, anchored by Frances McDormand’s performance as unflappable Minnesotan police officer Marge Gunderson.

20. Se7en 8.6

Two detectives, a rookie and a veteran, hunt a serial killer who uses the seven deadly sins as his modus operandi.1995 was a good year at the movies, with perennial favorites like Toy Story, The Usual Suspects, Braveheart and Heat all vying for the top-rated spot on our chart. But it’s David Fincher’s ultra-bleak thriller Se7en that captured our users’ imaginations like no other film before or since. Featuring by far the most downbeat ending of all the titles on this chart.

21. Shawshank Redemption 9.3

Two imprisoned men bond over a number of years, finding solace and eventual redemption through acts of common decency.Frank Darabont’s adaptation of Stephen King’s novella didn’t exactly set the box office on fire when it was released. It was also snubbed at the Oscars; nominated for 7 awards, it won none. But the movie found a second life on home video and cable TV. It has been at the top of IMDb’s Top 250 Chart for the best part of two decades, consistently outperforming classics such as The Godfather and Citizen Kane.

22. Schindler’s List 8.9

In Poland during World War II, Oskar Schindler gradually becomes concerned for his Jewish workforce after witnessing their persecution by the Nazis. Some people get an Academy Award later in their career almost as a consolation prize, after having been repeatedly ignored for their best work. But Steven Spielberg’s Oscar for Schindler’s List does not fall into that category: Although many felt that he should have been recognized earlier, there’s no denying that Schindler’s List showcases the talents of a director at the height of his powers. The fact that he also had a commercial blockbuster with Jurassic Park in the same year surely helped!

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23. Reservoir Dogs 8.4

After a simple jewelery heist goes terribly wrong, the surviving criminals begin to suspect that one of them is a police informant.Who knew that a talky, sometimes even stagy, heist movie — which doesn’t even show the actual heist! could be so innovative and exciting! Thanks to this film and to 1994’s Pulp Fiction gangster films would continue to be populated by chatty, colorful oddball characters for the next decade.

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24. Silence of the Lambs 8.6

A young F.B.I. cadet must confide in an incarcerated and manipulative killer to receive his help on catching another serial killer who skins his victims. Even after almost 25 years and countless parodies and “Chianti and fava beans” jokes, Hannibal Lecter remains a cultural icon and the protagonist of a critically acclaimed and now sadly canceled TV series. Although this was not Hannibal’s first cinematic appearance — that honor goes to Michael Mann’s manhunter. It was The Silence of the Lambs and Anthony Hopkins’ Oscar-winning performance that made him a household name.

25. GoodFellas

8.7

Henry Hill and his friends work their way up through the mob hierarchy.”As far back as I can remember, I’ve always wanted to be a gangster.” And after watching Goodfellas and its colorful slice of life in the mob, audiences were at least able to understand that sentiment but never share it. Another Scorsese masterpiece which uncompromisingly depicts the seediest, most violent aspects of the mob. Like most sociopaths, Scorsese’s good fellas can be charming and at times even funny, but they are monsters. And yet, you can’t take your eyes off them.

9. The Departed 8.5

An undercover cop and a mole in the police attempt to identify each other while infiltrating an Irish gang in South Boston. Maybe the most amazing feat of The Departed is that it fits perfectly within Martin Scorsese’s oeuvre despite being a remake of a foreign language film, internal affairs. Part of the plaudits must go to William Mohahan’s screenplay, which transports the action from Hong Kong to Boston, and to a stellar cast, led by Jack Nicholson’s performance as a Whitey Bulger-inspired gangster. But it is Scorsese’s sure-handed direction that seals the deal and finally earned him a long-overdue Best Director.

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