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In just a few days, on November 3rd, the US presidential elections will take place, the most dangerous in history, and not only for the United States, but for everybody on the planet.

That vote, that by now has been going on for several weeks, confronts two septuagenarians, is largely defined by technology, social networks or search engines, which already influence the electorate much more than television, newspapers or radio. With Twitter, the chronicler of Donald Trump’s presidency; and Facebook, now turned into a sinister echo chamber that benefits conservatives to worrisome limits, it won’t be the candidates’ programs that really influences the outcome next Tuesday, but rather the decisions that social networks make regarding their management of information. …


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Distributed work, largely a result of the pandemic lockdown, are forcing many companies to rethink their relationship with their workforce. Currently, about 33% of US employees work entirely remotely, 25% through so-called hybrid arrangements, while about two-thirds of those currently working remotely want to continue to do so in the future.

The first companies to react to the pandemic with distributed work policies were technology-based, not only because of the greater suitability of their activities, but also because they generally have more sophisticated people management policies. These are often known for a wide range of perks that are an important part of the culture of these companies and, in many cases, fundamental to worker satisfaction and loyalty. …


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No, I’m not going to talk about Apple and the launch of the new iPhones: by now, everything you might want to read and more has already been said. What I would like to talk about are my impressions of the second Apple event to took place under the COVID-19 pandemic (the third if you consider WWDC 2020, a different type of event for a developer audience), which reinforced those from the first one: they are now much better and more colorful than when the company used to hold them in a crowded theater in the pre-pandemic era.

Apple is obviously an exception here: very few brands can turn a simple product launch into a world-class event that interests millions of people all over the world. There was a time when the company, in fact, took advantage of this to differentiate itself and to achieve broad media coverage: when journalists and opinion leaders were invited to one of these occasions, they not only attended, but felt enormously fortunate to participate in a kind of “liturgy”, uploading tweets with images or videos or doing live streaming, seeing it as almost a career highlight. …

About

Enrique Dans

Professor of Innovation at IE Business School and blogger at enriquedans.com

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