The Brilliance of a “Child” Like Mindset

When did life start telling you what was possible?

At what point did we stop dreaming big? At what point did our lives suppress that child inside that could accomplish anything?

Last night I found myself in an investment opportunity presentation. We started out with a little meet and greet of local investors and industry leaders. I felt a little uncomfortable at first because I don’t typically invest money in companies, partly because I don’t have that type of disposable income, and partially because my value is more in execution, not financing, but as I started talking with a few of these “Titans” I realized they were people just like me. Same questions, similar backgrounds, and I am guessing the same drive to succeed.

….I quickly felt that this was actually clouding my mind, and not allowing me to really appreciate what this dreamer was articulating.

As we settled down and got seated for the presentations, the Chief Partner (Business Development) started out by telling us that we were lucky to be a part of a group that is being addressed to get in on a billion dollar idea at this point. They were raising ~15 Million this year, and 50 Million next. This beginning framework immediately turned me off, but I thought I would let the CEO give his pitch and see what his plan was to use that money and monetize an idea. As he spoke I just kept thinking about the Operations side of what they were talking about, I am the Ops guy so it was natural to start thinking this way, but I quickly felt that this was actually clouding my mind, and not allowing me to really appreciate what this dreamer was articulating.

Dream big, explore all possibilities, and pursue with incredible persistence!

The pitch was all over the place. Monetizing at least 40 ideas with one single product. As I went back into the complexity of the operations structure that was needed to fulfill even one of these ideas, I started thinking about the book I am reading currently. (The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho) I am not finished with this book, but there is a lesson early on that speaks to finding passions, finding ideas, and growing older. The fable hit me hard when I was reading it because I found truth in this passage. How easy was it when you were a child to dream! How certain you were that you would be an astronaut, a fireman, a scientist. It’s life that gets in the way, it’s life that tells you that you need to look at your dreams and then tell yourself all the reasons why it couldn’t/shouldn’t be fulfilled. I believe this goes back to society’s perception of failure. (I wrote a small piece on this recently called How to Break the Comfort Zone Blues!) As I reflect on the meeting last night now, I am sincerely proud of that entrepreneur for chasing his dreams. Dream big, explore all possibilities, and pursue with incredible persistence!

Dreaming and your family

Failure, rejection, dreaming, and being different are the goals in life, not the issues.

As I embark on this journey called fatherhood there is one lesson I will work tirelessly to instill in my son and future children. Failure, rejection, dreaming, and being different are the goals in life, not the issues. When you get a bad grade on a test, find the drive to improve it next time. When you get rejected for a date, realize that some people have different desires as you at certain times. When you think that your goal is too big, you reach as hard as you can towards that goal and land where you do. The effort, the process, the journey of life is way more important than the marks you get along the way. You are successful if you play the game, and the only way to fail is to not play at all. It is incredible that at certain times in your life you live vicariously through your children, but this is for all of us. Whether you are 10 or 60, life is here for you to enjoy, so if it isn’t what you want you can change at any time.

One of my favorite entrepreneurs and podcasters is Lewis House’s The School of Greatness. I have heard him talk about one summer that his goal was to break out of his mold of being shy when it came to women. So every day he had to ask at least one woman for her phone number. He was rejected a lot, but he also got a lot of numbers, formed relationships, and ultimately found a way to defeat his shyness. Take that same lesson and apply it to life. Experience new things, find passions, grow your ambitions, and dream like you are 5 years old. You only get one shot at this world, and if you can’t constantly grow into what you want that life to be, then look in that mirror and decide what man you want to see.

Check out the books I am reading here!

Check out my other Blog posts here!

Check out Lewis Howe’s Website here!