Designing for Social Change

Students Shoulder-to-Shoulder Global Solution Forum 2016

Overview:

During this two day course you will be participating in a “design sprint” based on the real world challenges faced by our partner NGO’s. In the process, you will learn about and apply the key skills necessary in designing for social change.


The Design Challenges:

1.How might we re-purpose vacant spaces in urban areas?

  • Neglected urban areas hold great potential for creating more sustainable and livable cities. There are environmental, social and economic benefits to re-purposing under used urban spaces. As part of this design challenge, you and your team will design solutions for revitalizing under utilized or vacant urban spaces. In creating your solution, you should think about the unique needs of our partners in Detroit and New Orleans.

2.How might we reduce plastic use in areas that are experiencing a growth in tourism ?

  • The use of plastic water bottles, plastic bags and plastic wrappers is a growing problem around the world, with tourism largely to blame. While traveling, individuals often purchase and throw away many types of plastic waste. As part of this design challenge, you and your team will design solutions to reduce the use of plastic items in areas impacted by tourism. In creating your solution, you should think about the unique needs of our partners in Nicaragua, Tibet and Nepal.

3.How might we encourage healthier behaviors around food or water consumption?

  • In many places access to a diversified diet or clean water is a struggle, but as these things become more accessible it is also difficult to change perceptions around them. Once access is created the difficulty becomes educating communities about the benefits. As part of this design challenge, you and your team will design solutions to show communities the benefits of a diversified diet and clean drinking water. In creating your solution, you should think about the unique needs of our partners in Cambodia (diversified food supply), Pine Ridge (access to buffalo meat), Kenya (diversified food supply), and Bolivia (access to clean drinking water).

Day 1

The Inspiration Phase

Choosing a Design Thinking Challenge

  • Which challenge most excites you?
  • Where do you feel you could have the most impact?

Case Study:

Inspiration


Day 2

Synthesis and Ideation

Synthesis

  • Sharing stories
  • Clustering themes
  • Creating insight statements

Prototyping

  • Select ideas
  • Create pitch
  • Pitch prototype for feedback

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.