Old columns of an ancient forum
Old columns of an ancient forum
Photo by Ümit Yıldırım on Unsplash

For online classes, there’s an oft-used phrase: “post once, reply twice.” This phrase makes its way into the instructions of many online discussions, and it tells students that they’re required to make at least one post, then respond to two of their classmates. This is a common assignment to assess participation in hybrid and online classes, and it’s especially common with a shift toward remote learning.

Ideally, a student will share their own views of the topic at hand, then respond to other students’ idiosyncratic views, mimicking a classroom discussion and allowing ideas to mix and conversation to flow. …


The following was originally published on the Wolfram Blog. The original post can be viewed here.

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After working our way through chemical reactions, solutions and structure and bonding, we close out our step-by-step chemistry series with quantum chemistry. Quantum chemistry is the application of quantum mechanics to atoms and molecules in order to understand their properties.

Have you ever wondered why the periodic table is structured the way it is or why chemical bonds form in the first place? The answers to those questions and many more come from quantum chemistry.


The following was originally published on the Wolfram Blog. The original post can be viewed here.

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We’re back with another post in our chemistry series, to explore molecular structure and bonding with Wolfram|Alpha and its step-by-step chemistry offerings. Read more on chemical reactions and solutions from previous posts, and keep an eye out for our final installment on quantum chemistry!

Structure and bonding in chemistry refer to where the atoms in a molecule are and what holds those atoms together. Molecules are held together by chemical bonds between the atoms comprising the molecule. …


Colorful sheaf of papers to the left of the photo
Colorful sheaf of papers to the left of the photo
Photo by Iwona Castiello d'Antonio on Unsplash

You’ve worked your way through your lesson plans. You’ve covered a topic in depth, and it’s nearing the end of the semester. You want to assess students’ knowledge and see the connections they’ve made. Rather than doing a cumulative exam, how about having them create a portfolio to showcase what they’ve learned?

Portfolios are a way to see how students connect what they’ve been taught, usually with their own personal flair. Portfolios can include papers, lessons, presentations, reflections and more. …


Today we have an interview with a special guest: William J. Turkel, coding advocate and author of the open textbook Digital Research Methods with Mathematica. This interview has been lightly edited for style.

William J. Turkel is a longtime educator with a passion for digital research methods. In his years of teaching, he’s used computational power to facilitate learning for his students and to do research in such areas as digital history and the history of technoscience.

Years ago, he noticed a gap in materials about digital humanities-based research methods. To meet this need, he wrote Digital Research Methods with Mathematica, an open-access, open-source textbook designed for both self-paced and classroom learning. The book, shared as a Mathematica notebook, walks readers through how to use Mathematica to read and scrape data, create forecasts and perform analyses in a variety of contexts. …


Camera and lenses
Camera and lenses
Photo by Conor Luddy on Unsplash

For a book about transforming maths education, the topic of photography appears surprisingly often in Conrad Wolfram’s The Math(s) Fix. At first glance, maths and photography may seem largely unrelated, but the fundamental shift from analogue to digital photography is still fresh in the minds of anyone not born this side of the millennium. Maths, Wolfram argues, is about to go the same way.

One of the core tenets of The Math(s) Fix is that our education system is stuck: stuck using old methods to teach students how to use old tools that help them solve old problems. …


Sunlit path
Sunlit path
Photo by Patrick Fore on Unsplash

The midpoint is a tricky place to be. Sometimes it’s an indicator of progress, something to inspire you to keep moving forward. Sometimes it’s a reminder that there’s still so much further to go.

Computational thinking can help you — and your students — find your footing as you work toward a goal, whether it’s the end of a project or the end of the semester. By using such skills as decomposition, abstraction and algorithmic thinking, you can make the midpoint less frustrating and build a pathway to keep going.

Abstraction for the Bigger Picture

Abstraction takes the minutiae of things and puts it into larger focus. With coding, abstraction helps to make small details become codified objects. It creates stand-ins for big-picture ideas. For everyday life, abstraction makes sure that less important details don’t derail a project. Abstraction also helps to clarify how smaller parts contribute to a whole. …


The following was originally published on the Wolfram Blog. The original post can be viewed here.

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In our last post, we kicked off a four-part series on Wolfram|Alpha’s step-by-step chemistry offerings with chemical reactions. Future posts will cover chemical structure and bonding along with quantum chemistry. We continue this post with chemical solutions, another foundational component of all chemistry classes.

From the blood in your veins to the oceans covering the planet, solutions are everywhere! Understanding their chemical properties is essential to sustaining life, creating new materials and treating illness. …


The following was originally published on the Wolfram Blog. The original post can be viewed here.

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If you’re studying chemistry or are in a discipline requiring chemistry prerequisite courses, then you know how expensive the required textbooks can be. To combat this, the chemical education community has developed open educational resources to provide free chemistry textbooks. However, although free textbooks keep cash in your wallet, they don’t include solution guides for all the homework problems.

Luckily, the Step-by-Step Solutions feature of Wolfram|Alpha has got your back! Whether you’re studying remotely or collaborating via video conferencing, Wolfram|Alpha helps you learn and apply the problem-solving frameworks for chemical word problems. The step-by-step solutions provide stepwise solution guides that can be viewed one step at a time or all at once. …


A Harry Potter trivia website, a bakery webpage and a movie review site were my first coding projects. From this small start, I would go on to learn at least four more programming languages and create a variety of projects like Conway’s Game of Life, robot controls and a function that uses machine learning to classify the shapes of 3D cellular automata.

I started coding in seventh grade when I learned HTML and CSS in math class. I was excited to learn to code and loved the idea that the words I wrote could translate to a webpage for the world to see. …

About

Tech-Based Teaching Editor

Tech-Based Teaching is all about computational thinking, edtech, and the ways that tech enriches learning. Want to contribute? Reach out to edutech@wolfram.com.

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