Equals sign in orange star shape with a molecule to the right
Equals sign in orange star shape with a molecule to the right

In a previous cross-post, we explored different math concepts found in chemistry class and how Wolfram|Alpha can help walk you through them step by step. Here is a continuation of that post, offering a look at even more ways to improve your studies.

You can view the original post in full on the Wolfram Blog by clicking here.

4. Solving for x

Another important concept needed to succeed in your first chemistry class is how to solve for x using inverse operations. …

The following is an excerpt of a post originally published on the Wolfram Blog. The original post can be viewed in full here.

Math is one of the main things that deters students from wanting to learn more about chemistry. Being a chemical engineering student, I understand this, especially for students who just have to get chemistry out of the way as a general education requirement. Essentially, step-by-step solutions are like your own on-demand math tutor: in addition to calculating the answer, Wolfram|Alpha shows you how it got there. …

Staggered patios and windows with colored walls in between
Staggered patios and windows with colored walls in between
Photo by Paweł Czerwiński on Unsplash

It can be difficult to meet new people, whether it’s for networking or building friendships. Meeting people was a challenge even before the pandemic, but the usual advice — go out, join a group, do a meet-up — doesn’t apply when social distancing rules are in place. How can teachers meet with other educators online, particularly when they’ve relied on conferences or in-person groups in the past?

Social media can be a good way to connect with new people, although it’s not without its share of faults. Not all social media platforms are the same. Some have better security and…

Pattern recognition — the act of finding patterns in a group of objects, things or ideas — is a part of computational thinking. It’s looking at a set and finding the commonalities between each item in that set. Patterns can extend beyond object-level comparisons; there can also be macro-level patterns, such as pattern of groups of objects.

Dominoes and pips in various colors
Dominoes and pips in various colors
Photo by Mick Haupt on Unsplash

Pattern recognition is a first step in problem solving. It can be hard to solve problems without knowing the full extent of what’s involved! …

The following was originally published on the Wolfram Blog. The original post can be viewed here.

In the days of online learning and remote work, students are gaining valuable skills to help them navigate their education. With new needs for greater independence in their learning journeys, better time management and finding communities in unexpected places, students are already encountering important lessons. Student-centered events like the Wolfram Emerging Leaders Program help foster success in the workplace and in life, no matter what happens in the world.

Alongside these soft skills, more specific practices like computational thinking are at the forefront of…

Grey toolbox filled with tools like screwdrivers
Grey toolbox filled with tools like screwdrivers
Photo by Tekton on Unsplash

The following includes excerpts from the Creative Commons–licensed textbook Online Learning Toolbox, a collaborative text written in part by students at Iowa State University during a fall 2019 EDUC-507 class and edited by Evrim Baran. The book has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license.

Texts have been reproduced as closely as possible to their original publication with light grammatical edits, albeit excerpted. More substantive edits are marked by brackets. Images have been added. Nested list items are indicated by a bullet followed by a greater-than sign: >.

Online education goes beyond remote learning…

Old columns of an ancient forum
Old columns of an ancient forum
Photo by Ümit Yıldırım on Unsplash

For online classes, there’s an oft-used phrase: “post once, reply twice.” This phrase makes its way into the instructions of many online discussions, and it tells students that they’re required to make at least one post, then respond to two of their classmates. This is a common assignment to assess participation in hybrid and online classes, and it’s especially common with a shift toward remote learning.

Ideally, a student will share their own views of the topic at hand, then respond to other students’ idiosyncratic views, mimicking a classroom discussion and allowing ideas to mix and conversation to flow. …

The following was originally published on the Wolfram Blog. The original post can be viewed here.

After working our way through chemical reactions, solutions and structure and bonding, we close out our step-by-step chemistry series with quantum chemistry. Quantum chemistry is the application of quantum mechanics to atoms and molecules in order to understand their properties.

Have you ever wondered why the periodic table is structured the way it is or why chemical bonds form in the first place? The answers to those questions and many more come from quantum chemistry.

The following was originally published on the Wolfram Blog. The original post can be viewed here.

We’re back with another post in our chemistry series, to explore molecular structure and bonding with Wolfram|Alpha and its step-by-step chemistry offerings. Read more on chemical reactions and solutions from previous posts, and keep an eye out for our final installment on quantum chemistry!

Structure and bonding in chemistry refer to where the atoms in a molecule are and what holds those atoms together. Molecules are held together by chemical bonds between the atoms comprising the molecule. …

Colorful sheaf of papers to the left of the photo
Colorful sheaf of papers to the left of the photo
Photo by Iwona Castiello d'Antonio on Unsplash

You’ve worked your way through your lesson plans. You’ve covered a topic in depth, and it’s nearing the end of the semester. You want to assess students’ knowledge and see the connections they’ve made. Rather than doing a cumulative exam, how about having them create a portfolio to showcase what they’ve learned?

Portfolios are a way to see how students connect what they’ve been taught, usually with their own personal flair. Portfolios can include papers, lessons, presentations, reflections and more. …

Tech-Based Teaching Editor

Tech-Based Teaching is all about computational thinking, edtech, and the ways that tech enriches learning. Want to contribute? Reach out to edutech@wolfram.com.

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