I don’t want your thoughts and prayers.

I dont want your thoughts and prayers if you still think LGBTQ people using the bathroom are a threat to public safety.

I don’t want your thoughts and prayers if you think owning assault weapons is acceptable while gay men donating blood is unacceptable.

I don’t want your thoughts and prayers if you think Islam is the problem when three of our presidential candidates showed support for a Christian pastor who advocates for the execution of queer people.

I don’t want your thoughts and prayers if you care more about your right to own a weapon than my LGBTQ brothers’ and sisters’ right to live.

I don’t want your thoughts and prayers if you were elected to represent the people of this country and instead represent the NRA, or voted to allow terrorists on the no fly list access to guns.

I don’t want your thoughts and prayers if you think this is somehow an isolated incident, as if this just happened to be at a gay club on Latin night featuring trans performers during Pride, as if all those things aren’t treated with contempt, fear, animus, and resentment on a daily basis.

I don’t want your thoughts and prayers at all, because thoughts and prayers have done nothing to prevent these tragedies from happening again and again.

I want your activism and your voice and your votes. I want you to channel your outrage into meaningful action. I want you to stand up to homophobia and transphobia whenever it occurs, however small the slight, because microagressions pave the way for bloodshed. I want you to vote from conscience, not from fear.

Because fear can’t win. I am terrorized, and I am going to try my damnedest now to be gayer than ever, to be relentlessly queer. Because fear can’t win, and I don’t want your thoughts and prayers.

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