Learning progress of a student at the Mindspark Centres

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The Mindspark Learning Centres provide personalized learning to over 4500 low-income learners in Delhi over the last 3.5 years. Mindspark Centres use an adaptive learning platform for imparting literacy and numeracy skills to children to provide a personalized learning path to each child based on their performance and their misconceptions.

While there is general awareness about the poor learning levels of our learners, parents have few choices for better learning opportunities. In the case of economically weaker sections, the problem is more severe as we have first generation learners who struggle with basic learning skills like reading and problem solving.

What learning support she received

  • Over the last 3 years, Poonam has attended about 400 Mindspark sessions on Math and Language followed by offline instruction to support her with concepts that she was weak in.
  • Poonam completed about 28,000 questions with 75% accuracy in this period. On an average she has answered 60 questions each day. All these questions tested for conceptual understanding and were not based on rote-learning or memorization.
  • She was given topics based on her learning level and her performance on each topic determined her pace of moving ahead. Since her learning progress was different for Math and Language, her learning path moved differently in both subjects.
  • Based on her learning progress, Poonam was allowed to move to higher learning grades when she successfully completed the content from lower grades.

Poonam’s learning curve

When Poonam first came to the Mindspark centre, she was already a level behind in her Math skills. Based on large scale assessments like ASER and PROBE, it is seen that this gap widens with age. Poonam’s experience was different. In 1 year, she had caught up with the competencies of her school level and had started attempting content from higher grades.

Here we see that a child who was ‘lagging behind’ in school, has actually gone beyond her school grade’s learning competencies and being competent at skills higher than her school grade — escaping the ‘achievement failure’ trap.

By Anurima Chatterjee — (Center Manager, Mindspark Centers — Educational Initiatives, MA — Development Studies TISS)

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Originally published at blog.ei-india.com on November 28, 2015.

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