1920: The Other Russo-Japanese War

The Massacre at Nikolaevsk-on-Amur (尼港事件).

Eisel Mazard
Apr 15, 2016 · 86 min read
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Table of Contents:

§1. Thesis.

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Nikolaevsk is situated directly north of Japan, and on an historical trade-route that linked China to Japan, via the Amur River and then Sakhalin Island.

§2. The Macrocosm: Japan’s Intervention in Siberia.

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The oblast of Omsk is highlighted in red; note the tremendous distance from the Pacific Coast (i.e., although both Omsk and Nikolaevsk are considered part of Siberia, they are worlds apart).
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A Japanese propaganda image depicting their troops at Blagoveshchensk (relatively close to Nikolaevsk, in Eastern Siberia: a map is provided below).
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Woodrow Wilson in 1918.
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Gregorii Semenov (Wikipedia Image).
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Note the relationship between Harbin and Khabarovsk, and then the coast (Wikipedia image showing current railroads, not 1920 transport-conditions).
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The wayward Czech Legion (or at least part of it) in Siberia, 1918 (Wikipedia image).
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A propaganda-image of the Japanese troops in Vladivostok.

§3. The Microcosm: Nikolaevsk-on-Amur in 1920.

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An image of the town circa 1900 (prior to its destruction), c/o Wikipedia.
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Another image of the town, presumably showing the “five-domed cathedral” aforementioned.
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A map showing the current distance (by road) between Nikolaevsk and Blagoveshchensk.
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An image of Cossacks (not Siberian) in 1915.

§4. Prelude to a Massacre.

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The monument to the Nikolaevsk massacre in Otaru, Japan (Wikipedia). There has never been an equivalent monument in Russia, i.e., mourning the deaths of either the Japanese or the Russian townspeople slaughtered by the Communists.

§5.1 First the Massacre, then Utopia?

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§5.2 Rape and/or/as Race-Relations.

§5.3 The Massacre of the Japanese.

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A photo of indigenous Nivkhi men, 1902 (Wikipedia).

§5.4 Coup and Counter-Coup: Was the Violence Avertable?

§5.5 After the Utopia, Immolation.

§6.1 Conclusions on Geopolitics.

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§6.2 Conclusions on Communism.

[End.]

Bibliography.

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