The 4 Scrum Masters we don’t want in our team

I read a lot of posts about “what is a good Scrum Master” and thought, these posts are way too positive and friendly.. why not take a more destructive approach and see things from the negative side?

And if you make it to the end of the post, an insightful question awaits. Here goes..

  1. The impatient — A Scrum Master with not patience is like a cat without 9 lives- it just doesn’t work, a Scrum Master will most likely deal with issues that require change, and change my friends — often takes time. So, No Patience — No Scrum Master.
  2. The Self-centered — If all your Scrum Master cares about is how she is perceived, what bonus will she get this quarter and her own well-being, chances are you have selected the wrong person. The Scrum Master supports the team using the team achievement to encourage the team, not yourself you donkey.
  3. The rude — “We don’t need these stupid points to estimate!” i heard a Scrum Master say to her manager, and it does not really matter whether she was right or wrong, the fact is that it is very hard to get someone to cooperate with you when using this approach. A Scrum Master needs to be able to get people to respect and trust each other in order to improve collaboration. Rudeness is not the way.
  4. The self-righteous — Everyone can be wrong sometimes (yes, even me…), but if the Scrum Master considers himself as an “always right kind’a guy”, then Houston — we have a problem”.. Being wrong is part of the role description of the Scrum Master, being wrong allows you and others around you to feel safe to experiment and learn, which a critical element in inspect and adapt — Duh!

I assume that most of your Scrum Masters are not behaving as the post suggests, but my question to you is: 
Are you or your Scrum Masters doing anything that even remotely resembles these attributes?

Think about it for a while before you answer. For more, follow me on twitter @eladsof

May the force be with you,

Elad Sofer.


Originally published at practical-agile.com.

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