This image makes up part of Iturbide’s series capturing the indigenous Juchitán community of Mexico, a major focus of her work from 1979–1988. Iturbide was drawn to the Juchitán due to the social prominence afforded to women, particularly within the Zapotec society. In these matriarchal societies, women are dominant in all aspects of life, including commerce and religious ceremonies.

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Martin Parr has been photographing food long before it was a socially accepted norm. Today, a quick snap of one’s artisanally presented gourmet dish is obligatory in some circles. Social media is overwhelmed with carefully cropped, subtly edited images of home-cooked and expensive luxury meals. Parr began photographing food in 1994, during which the world slowly rolled into an era of ‘food porn’, presenting glamourised images of food in adverts, magazines, and other visual media. Savvier individuals formed lucrative internet careers eating and reviewing large amounts of takeaway food on camera to their audience’s delight. Before this edible obsession grew mainstream, however, Parr was honing in on the eating habits of people around the world, using his signature shooting style to present whimsical images of the things we choose to ingest.

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Tight Squeeze at Huxley-Parlour Gallery presents 11 sculptures by Swedish-Chilean artist, Anton Alvarez. The artist works primarily in clay, using a self-constructed, 3 tonne ceramic press which squeezes out distorted columnal sculptures ready to be glazed and fired. Leaving his process partly up to chance, Alvarez implements different tailored filters and pressures, adjusting the height of the machine’s platform to determine the sculptures’ length. What results is a group of heavily textured, uniquely formed sculptures that combine as an autonomous forest of fungi-like objects.

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Joel Sternfeld’s work is characterised by its attention to societal issues, delicately balanced with a subtle irony and humour. His most iconic photograph, McLean, Virginia, December 1978, was originally published in Sternfeld’s book American Prospects (1987), before going on to emblazon the cover of LIFE magazine in 1998. Within this image, Sternfeld toys with our deep-rooted perceptions, purposefully manipulating and moulding our visual first impressions.

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Throughout lockdown, Daniel Gordon’s practice has focussed on blending different media within a single picture plane. During this period, the artist created a unique body of work that is simultaneously sculptural, photographic, and painterly, coming together in his first UK solo exhibition Green Apples and Boots. Gordon’s process typically involves downloading and assembling found imagery from the internet and magazines, constructing a colourful and intricate tableau, and photographing the scene. However, during the period of isolation that came alongside Covid-19, the artist found himself drawn towards the personal objects littered throughout his house.

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Eleanor Lerman

Eleanor Lerman

experiential exhibition reviews and art history musings.