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Photo by John Jennings on Unsplash

Literature has a lot to offer. Entertainment, education, psychological and cultural enlightenment, even a hefty profit. But, now and then, a publication comes along that actually makes reality shift. It opens our eyes to truths we’re either oblivious of or avoiding. Most such books that come to mind are from the past and some people argue that modern literature just doesn’t pack the same punch. Why would that be? And what’s so special about books that change the world? Let’s explore the issue with past and present examples.

1984

George Orwell’s novel came out in 1949, a dystopian story about a totalitarian England watching and controlling its citizens’ behaviour, thoughts and even perception of the world. As real human governments keep veering in that same direction, it seems that 1984 will never stop being current. When people are in danger of falling into the same governmental, media and societal traps, this book resurfaces to wake them up and inspire them to stop its fictional narrative from becoming reality. …


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If you’re a creative writer, it’s likely you’ve already caught yourself alliterating a few times and wondered whether to keep that special phrase or not. Ask around about this device and you’ll find divided opinions. Some writers and readers consider it a fluffy descriptive tool of a bygone era. Others quite enjoy its playfulness.

This article is here to discuss what the effect of alliteration is compared to other literary devices. Why use it? When to avoid it? While the answers to these questions are subjective, it’s valuable to think about where you stand as a writer. And to know that you’re not alone in your love for fun artistic expression. …


Two perspectives of one encounter. A musician’s life really is full of surprises, good and bad. A fictionalised spin on true events.

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Photo by Facundo Aranda on Unsplash

Loose limbs stroll down the street. She almost bounces off the flagstones. But she’s too heavy, weighed down by a cracked fairy statue inked on her ankle and taut muscles between skin and bone. The other woman walking beside her could be her sister. Same tall, lanky stride. High cheekbones. Brown hair — straight, plain, greasy — flops against her back. They’re chatting happily, smiles as wide as the necks of their blouses — they gape around those thin leathery buttresses supporting almost skeletal faces, strong but sharp with malnutrition. …


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I’m curious. Did anyone advertise writing careers when you were growing up? Beyond the doctor, lawyer, architect, CEO paths. I remember having to come to that realisation on my own: I could write for a living! The problem was I didn’t have a clue how to pursue it and the many different avenues available.

Let’s make things a bit easier for the new writers out there, shall we? Here are five ways you can earn a living doing the thing you love.

Creative Writer

Let’s start with the obvious one… You can become a novelist, short story writer, poet, playwriter or so on. The challenge with this path is actually getting paid for it. There are independent publishers of short story anthologies like The Fiction Desk, who pay £20 per 1000 words for published submissions. …


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Cruel and cunning murderers like Jack the Ripper and Hannibal Lecter curdle the blood, while also exciting it. Serial killer documentaries and series find instant success, from Mindhunter to The Ted Bundy Tapes. But why? Murder stories and their protagonists, whether fictional or real, are attractive to us for a number of reasons.

Media Coverage

As if the public’s fascination wasn’t enough, news reports tend to escalate the situation. By giving killers fancy names, for instance! And bestowing them with a marketable legendary status. Which is then recycled and boosted through TV shows, news features, or museums. …


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Sex is a controversial part of literature, a blurred line separating “quality” literary texts from those aiming for commercial success. Like violence, it’s an element that can boost a book’s sales and earn either the praises of critics and casual readers alike or a place in the shadows of literature. So how can sexual features be incorporated effectively in a story? A good first step is understanding the complexities of writing and publishing erotic narratives.

Author’s Purpose

Every writer has to eventually ask themselves what their goal is. Make money? Play with words? Express overlooked or suppressed issues? Change the world? …


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When you think of fantasy in literature, the first image to come to mind probably involves magic, dragons, elves and epic battles. This is the genre’s most common and popular form today, but it’s far from the only one. The number of fantasy categories in existence — modern, dark, paranormal, alternative history — shows how influential this artistic direction is. Science fiction focuses on technological and scientific elements, but which are often no less imaginative. Magic realism is the best example of what fantasy as a highly creative device can and is meant to do in literature. …


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Photo by chrissie kremer on Unsplash

What a grumpy girl! Stubborn! Bites! Kicks! That horse has quite the reputation. But looking at her now, chomping on hay in the pale morning light, you wouldn’t suspect any of it. An old grey Arab. Handsome animal. Just thin with age, in body and temper.

Sure, she’s escaped her stall again, the wooden door wide open and creaking on its hinges. That’s brains, though — a horse learning to pull a bolt with its lips. If she hated her humans so much, she would’ve left the first time she freed herself. …


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Pixabay

Literature has always been a difficult thing to define, but the benefits of reading books not so much. While everyone may agree that it refers to any written work of art, from a poem to original writing on a sculpture, opinions clash when it comes to concepts like: Is it really art or technology? What determines its quality? Linguistic structure, ideas, psychological development of characters or all of these together? Where does literary fiction end and genre fiction begin?

There are popular books out there, like Laila Lalami’s The Other Americans dealing with deep concepts of immigration through a police investigation, that do fit into a particular category but still pack a semantic punch. That qualifies them as good works of literature. The most important question, however, is what such literature does for readers, the reason for the publishing industry’s very existence. …

About

Electra Nanou

Writer of creative and digital content. Follow my blog for debut book reviews: https://bookbreath.blog/

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